Medieval England: A Social History and Archaeology from the Conquest to 1600 A.D

By Colin Platt | Go to book overview

2

Economic Growth

Levels of wealth in a medieval society are at all times difficult to measure, and though Domesday has its value in this; as we have seen, it is made the more important by the fact that there is nothing in any way to take the place of the Domesday record before the lay subsidy returns of 1334, now at last in print, 1 even these telling us less than the earlier document can usually be made to do. However, it is at least clear that the most important characteristic of the English economy, in the thirteenth century through from the twelfth, was growth; not evenly sustained and not equally beneficial at every level of society, but a fact to be lived with all the same. It was swelling marketable surpluses on the land which financed the stone castles of the king and his magnates, which built the new monastic houses, and which found permanent and visible expression locally in the transformation of the parish church. It was to dispose of these surpluses, and in turn to encourage and create them, that the towns of England flourished and then multiplied.

Undoubtedly, the Normans played their part both in the foundation of new towns and in the enlargement of the old, using them, as they had done the castle and the monastery, very deliberately as instruments of colonization. But the great period of borough foundation, unconnected with the Normans, occurred rather later, in the century 1150 to 1250. And it was then, too, that urban communities in England most commonly acquired their precious identity in the law, further promoting their growth. Of urban institutions, it is enough here to say that they had achieved, within this period, substantial independence from the countryside, with valuable freedoms and specially tailored exemptions which helped develop the professionalization of trade. 2 Alongside this, the physical evidence, though less subtle, is considerably more dramatic. It shows us first the proliferation of trading communities, at just this time, with a claim to be described as 'towns'. And then, as excavations continue on urban sites throughout the country, it is beginning to establish for us, in a number of ways, the lines along which such growth may actually have occurred.

Few counties, perhaps, are likely to illustrate this proliferation of boroughs

-30-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Medieval England: A Social History and Archaeology from the Conquest to 1600 A.D
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Preface and Acknowledgments xiii
  • Preface to the 1994 Edition xvii
  • 1 - The Anglo-Norman Settlement 1
  • 2 - Economic Growth 30
  • 3 - Set-Back 91
  • 4 - After the Black Death 126
  • 5 - Stability at a Reduced Level: the Church 138
  • 6 - Conspicuous Waste 173
  • 7 - Reorientation Under the Tudors 205
  • Abbreviations 251
  • Notes and References 252
  • Index 284
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 294

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.