5

ROSE-COLOURED LEGEND AND PITCH-BLACK LEGEND

In the mother countries, the rose-coloured legend assumed a multiplicity of forms, wherever it may have been found in the “colonial party”, in the make-believe world of the writers and artists. The pitch-black legend likewise from its very origin arose from several centres and expressed itself in different forms. In the twentieth century both made use of the cinema.

In the West colonization has been certainly presented as an essentially economic fact. It was also a proselytizing enterprise which assumed it had a mission to christianize and civilize peoples deemed to be or defined as inferior. Still at the very outset this representation of colonization was challenged. Without doubt the colonized peoples did not fail to manifest their sensitivity to the different aspects of the phenomenon. But the racist aspect of colonization provoked their anger and incited them to offer the most dogged resistance because they felt that their identity was at stake. It is a moot question whether the colonizers were aware of the problem. Those who called into question the principle of colonization certainly were, but to the point that they did not perceive that racism prevailed also among the colonized peoples, at least among some of them, and well before the Europeans laid their hands on them.

The eulogists of the colonial saga saw things from a different perspective. A sophisticated structure of propaganda had been built, channelled by newspapers, illustrated magazines, post cards, school text-books, and colonial exhibitions like, among others, that of 1931 in Paris. Such a system was more or less organized by what came to be known as the “colonial party”, with its lobbies. Long before the effective elaboration of an imperialist policy, men like Thomas Carlyle in Great Britain, Chomyakov and Tiouttchev in Russia, proclaimed the superiority of the British, of the Slav. These movements spawned leagues which were set up in every country: the Round Table circle in Great Britain, the Deutscher Nationalverein in Germany, the Società nazionale in Italy. In France men like Eugène Etienne before 1914 and Paul Doumer, especially after the First World War, were the foremost champions of this colonial party.

However this influence descending from on high merged with another

-163-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Colonization: A Global History
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • 1 - Colonization or Imperialism 1
  • 2 - The Initiatives 24
  • 3 - Conflicts for an Empire 52
  • 4 - A New Race of Societies 104
  • 5 - Rose-Coloured Legend and Pitch-Black Legend 163
  • 6 - The Vision of the Vanquished 186
  • 7 - The Movements for Colonist-Independence 211
  • 8 - Leaven and Levers 239
  • 9 - Independence or Revolution 262
  • 10 - Liberation or Decolonization 305
  • 11 - Decolonization Halted 344
  • Chronology 361
  • Filmographic Selection 370
  • Bibliography 376
  • Index 390
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 402

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.