The Gold Standard in Theory and History

By Barry Eichengreen; Marc Flandreau | Go to book overview

Further reading

Readers seeking to pursue the issues addressed in this volume must cast their net widely. No single work provides comprehensive coverage of the history, theory, and doctrine of the gold standard, much less all three. This guide provides some suggestions about where to begin the search for further information.

The best surveys of doctrine on the gold standard remain Viner (1937) and Fetter (1965). Readers desiring a more modern perspective should consult Bordo (1984).

Models of the price specie-flow mechanism appear in the standard textbooks of international economics, but the literature contains few unified theoretical treatments of the roles of interest rates, capital flows, and changes in output and spending in the gold-standard adjustment mechanism. Although all of these effects appear in the early theoretical work of Meade (1951), it is difficult to pick them out. Mundell (1971) and Dornbusch and Frenkel (1984) provide more modern but more stylized treatments. A model of the determination of the price level under the gold standard is developed by Barro (1979) and extended to the case of gold as an exhaustible resource by Bordo and Ellson (1985).

Readers interested in the structure of nineteenth-century financial markets should start with Kindleberger (1993) and Neal (1990). For overviews of the structure of the international monetary system, Bloomfield's (1959, 1963) classic surveys remain unsurpassed. Many of the issues raised by Bloomfield are analyzed statistically by Morgenstern (1959) and contributors to Bordo and Schwartz (1984). McKinnon (1996) and Eichengreen (1996) contrast international adjustment under the gold standard with

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