Docklands: Cultures in Conflict, Worlds in Collision

By Janet Foster | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

There are many people whose support was invaluable while I was researching and writing this book, during which time I have changed jobs twice and become a mum. The project was only made possible in the first instance by the T.H. Marshall Fellowship funded by the British Journal of Sociology at the London School of Economics. I am immensely grateful to those involved in establishing this fellowship and for the opportunity it provided me to investigate the impact of urban change and community transition on the Isle of Dogs, and to Paul Rock in particular, who offered support through the good times and the bad. As ever, his insights during the fieldwork and comments on the manuscript were very helpful indeed.

Many staff in the Department of Sociology at Warwick deserve thanks too. The critical mass of qualitative researchers there provided me with greater confidence that ethnography was a bona fide form of social enquiry and colleagues including Ellen Annandale, Jim Beckford, Bob Burgess and Margaret Archer in different ways provided intellectual stimulation or other support for which I am most grateful. I would especially like to thank Carol Wolkowitz for many convivial train journeys from Coventry to London in which progress on this research was often discussed; Nina Cope, my excellent teaching assistant; and the Warwick Research and Innovations fund which helped finance the transcription costs. More recently my colleagues at Cambridge, Ben Bowling and Loraine Gelsthorpe, deserve special thanks for listening as I agonized over the final stages of writing and for commenting on all or parts of drafts.

Eve Hostettler at the Island History Trust deserves thanks for her help during the research, her supportive comments on the manuscript, and facilitated the use not only of the Trust's photographs but others in the collection too. Kutub acted as an interpreter and without him the interviews with many of the Bengalis would not have been possible. PC Phil Hanford compiled the racial harassment statistics and DS Giles at 3 Area provided other crime data. Moira Parkes willingly transcribed some of the hundreds of hours of interviews with Neil Dion as well as chasing up references. Most of all she provided moral support when I very much needed it.

I am indebted to all of those, too numerous to mention by name, who kindly agreed to sit with me and my tape recorder to relate their experiences and made me so welcome. Without them this book would never have been written. I would also like to thank all those individuals and agencies who allowed me to reproduce photographs or tables in the book.

-ix-

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Docklands: Cultures in Conflict, Worlds in Collision
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • List of Figures xi
  • List of Tables xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter One - “echoes of the Past” 9
  • Chapter Two - Dreams and Schemes 47
  • Chapter Three - “we Didn't Have Time to Be Nice to People” 91
  • Chapter Four - “grab and Greed” 117
  • Chapter Five - Different Worlds 159
  • Chapter Six - “a Slice of the Cake” 209
  • Chapter 7 - It All Turns Very Nasty: 249
  • Chapter Eight - “a Different Place Altogether” 287
  • Chapter Nine - Making Sense of It All: 313
  • Postscript 353
  • References 365
  • Index 377
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