Handbook of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Administration and Policy

By Wallace Swan | Go to book overview

15

Conclusion

Wallace Swan

Minneapolis, Minnesota, U.S.A.

So where does the international GLBT administration and policy movement go from here? Some of the answers are relatively clearer, while others are extraordinarily ambiguous.

If nothing else, the events of September 11, 2001 point out that there is a terrible divide between the rights of GLBT people in developed nations and those in many parts of the remainder of the world. It became clear to this editor that many of those who wish to attack the symbols of Western civilization and democracy are also those who hate women's rights, gay rights, and sexuality in general. Of course the issue is complicated by the fact that globalization, international capitalism, environmental degradation, and similar phenomena often seem to follow in the footsteps of Western civilization and democracy. Western democracy under threat also gives rise to threats to individual liberty, which may at sometime endanger the rights of women and gay people as well, in addition to endangering the rights of racial and ethnic minorities. The editor, who participated in a demonstration to protect the rights of Muslim people in Minnesota, was struck by the fact that in some ways his participation could be seen as a one-way relationship. Some fundamentalist Muslims might prefer not to support any rights for gay people. On the other hand, the gay Muslims the editor reads about on an almost daily basis in the gay Muslim newsletter Al Fatiha are placed in the almost impossible situation of being gay people exiled from a culture that often persecutes them, while at the same time existing in an western society that is threatening their Muslim personhood during a period of xenophobia.

-349-

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