Handbook of Conflict Management

By William J. Pammer Jr.; Jerri Killian | Go to book overview

9

Mediated Negotiation and Democratic Theory

Implications for Practice

Gary Marshall
University of Nebraska at Omaha, Nebraska, U.S.A.

Connie Ozawa
Portland State University, Portland, Oregon, U.S.A.


I.

INTRODUCTION

This chapter examines an established organizing process, known as mediated negotiation, that has become evident in planning, resource management, program development, and delivery, and policy-making decisions in the United States. Our overriding argument is that the mediated negotiation setting is an effective container for the working through of public issues in a way that furthers both individual and societal development. From our perspective, the unit o f analysis is relationship-the reflexive relationship one has with him or herself ( the o ther) and the relationship that he or she has with the other members of the mediated negotiation environment.

The intent of this chapter is to provide a brief historical overview of the emergence of public policy mediation, and a clarification of our definition of democracy, through reference to major writers on the topic and to elaborate on the connection between notions of democracy and consensus-building practice.


II.

BACKGROUND

Over the last one-third of the 20th century, public decision-making in the United States underwent considerable change. During the tumultuous 1960s, demands

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Handbook of Conflict Management
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • 1 - Conflict Resolution Education 3
  • 2 - The Qualities of Peacemakers 33
  • 3 - Contested Truths 49
  • 4 - Experiential Learning 85
  • Discussion Questions: Part I 101
  • 5 - Dispute System Design in Organizations 105
  • 6 - Assessing Group Conflict 129
  • 7 - Workplace Bullying 149
  • 8 - Political and Administrative Roles in School District Governance 169
  • Discussion Questions: Part II 203
  • 9 - Mediated Negotiation and Democratic Theory 207
  • 10 - Conflict Management and Community Partnering 219
  • 11 - The Method of Dialogue 243
  • 12 - The Only Game in Town 257
  • Discussion Questions: Part III 269
  • Index 271
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