Assessment in Physical Education: A Teacher's Guide to the Issues

By Bob Carroll | Go to book overview

Chapter 7

Recording Achievement

Are ROA Achieving Their Purposes?

Although events moved quickly in the 1980s in respect of Government action and implementation of policies in respect of ROA, the ideas and purposes of records were not new and one could suggest it had taken the government forty years to react to the Norwood Report (Board of Education, 1943). PE teachers will find it interesting to note that games were specifically mentioned.

The first part would contain a record of the share which the pupil had taken in the general life of the school, games, societies and the like. It would, in short, give the reader some idea of the way in which he had used the opportunities offered to him by his education, using the term in its widest sense. (p. 48)

The second part referred inevitably to examination results. The main concern here (and since) was the unsatisfactory nature of examination certificates as a school leaving document and a record of pupils' achievements. Many pupils were leaving without any certification at all or with a minimum of examination entries/passes. The aim then was primarily a summary document, as were many of the early attempts at ROA, for example the Record of Personal Achievement (RPA) in Swindon from 1969 (Swales, 1979), the Evesham High School Personal Achievement Record (PAR) in 1979, the Scottish Council for Research in Education (SCRE) profile in 1976 (SCRE, 1977). These developments saw the introduction of pupil recording, and the inclusion of personal qualities and achievements in non-academic subjects.

PE is, of course, regarded as non-academic and is strong in personal qualities, and achievements in PE are something which many pupils will value. However, these early attempts did have the stigma of a 'low ability image' and credibility in some quarters as a leaving document. There were still only a small number of schools involved in ROA by 1980 (twenty-five according to Balogh, 1982), but despite the low status image and difficulties, their value to all pupils was being considered. The early 1980s saw developments in Wiltshire and through a liaison of four local authorities with the University of Oxford Delegacy of Local Examinations (OCEA) in 1982 (Fairbairn, 1988), which were the beginnings of

-98-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Assessment in Physical Education: A Teacher's Guide to the Issues
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 152

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.