Teachers as Mentors: A Practical Guide

By Barbara Field; Terry Field | Go to book overview

Chapter 4

The New Role of the Teacher Mentoring

Barbara Field


From Supervisor to Teacher Educator

In the past in England and Wales, and still in Australia, only about 25 per cent of the initial teacher education course has been conducted by way of practicum in schools. The main part of the course was conducted in universities where students learnt about how to teach. They learnt amongst other subjects, the sociology, the psychology and the philosophy of education and they learnt the theory of teaching particular subjects. They were then expected to make the connection of this information that they were given at university with the classrooms in which they were practising. The supervising teachers, as has been seen in Chapter 3, saw their task as socialising the student into the profession. The teacher education areas mentioned above were dealt with only incidentally by school teachers. Traditionally, the term 'teacher educator' has applied only to tertiary staff.

Some teacher educators are worried that making initial teacher education more school-based will result in a return to an 'apprenticeship' model of teaching. The kaleidoscope of knowledge and skills that teacher education encompasses is much more, they claim, than can be achieved by 'sitting by Nellie', no matter how good a teacher Nellie is. If the practicum is to be more than an apprenticeship, if teaching is more than a skilled trade, then provision has to be made in schools, in initial teacher education programs, for the relationship of theory and practice to be recognised. With an initial teacher education program that is two-thirds school-based, provision has to be made in the school's side of the partnership as well as in the university's side, for the theory/ practice link to be made. If this is not done, schools will continue to do the same as they have done in the past but, because of the increased time, will do 'more of the same'. Because of their reduced time with

-63-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Teachers as Mentors: A Practical Guide
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 174

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.