Expertise versus Responsiveness in Children's Worlds: Politics in School, Home and Community Relationships

By Maureen McClure; Jane Clark Lindle | Go to book overview

explicable, the politics of eduation may not be particularly rational (Lugg 1996), nor perhaps should it be viewed as such (Lindblom and Woodhouse 1993). For those committed to strengthening public attention, a reexamination of religion in American public life is in order. There are powerful and disconcerting cultural reasons for American conservative ideology's political longevity that must be explored if one is to be 'critically engaged' in shaping educational policy.


Note
1.
For example, conservative commentator William F. Buckley called for the represssion of Dr Martin Luther King, viewing both King and the civil rights movement as a direct threat to tradition (1968:137). 'Repression is an unpleasant instrument, but it is absolutely necessary for civilizations that believe in order and human rights. I wish to God Hitler and Lenin had been repressed. And word should be gently got through to the nonviolent avengers that in the unlikely even that they succeed in mobilizing their legions, they will be most efficiently, indeed most zestfully, repressed. In the name, quite properly, of social justice.'

References
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LINDBLOM, C.E. and WOODHOUSE, E.J. (1993) The Policy-Making Process, 3rd edn (Englewood Cliffs: Prentice Hall).

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