School Effectiveness for Whom? Challenges to the School Effectiveness and School Improvement Movements

By Roger Slee; Gaby Weiner et al. | Go to book overview

The existence of poor schools which are a result of historical, social, and economic circumstances and political decisions is not unique to the UK. Many countries are attempting to improve school and pupil performance, particularly in deprived and poverty-stricken city areas. As a solution to these problems, none of them seems to have chosen the 'blame and shame' policy which characterizes the treatment of schools in this country in the 1990s, which results in school closure accompanied by public humiliation.


Note
1
The legislation on failing schools and education associations is set out in the Education Act 1993 (Part V, Chapters I and II) and DfE Circular 17/93 Schools Requiring Special Measures.

References
BALL, S.J., BOWE, R. and GEWITZ, S. (1996) 'School choice, social class and distinction: The realisation of social advantage in education', Journal of Education Policy, 11, 1, pp. 89-112.
BARBER, M. (1995) 'New start for pupils sold short by Council policies', The Independent, 28 July.
BARBER, M. (1996) The Learning Game, London: Gollancz.
BECKETT, A. (1994) 'Scenes from the classroom war', Independent on Sunday, 27 November, pp. 48-50.
BERNSTEIN, B. (1970) 'Education cannot compensate for society', New Society, 26 February, p. 344.
BLAIR, T. (1996) 'Twentieth Anniversary Lecture', Ruskin College, Oxford, 16 December.
BRACE, A. (1994) 'Is this the worst school in Britain?' Mail on Sunday, 20 March.
DFE (1992) Choice and Diversity: A New Framework for Schools, London: Department for Education.
DFEE (1997) Excellence for Everyone, London: Department for Education and Employment.
GOLDSTEIN, H. (1996) The Methodology of School Effectiveness Research, London: Institute of Education.
HOFKINS, D. (1993) 'Branded as Failures', Times Education Supplement, 10 December, p. 8.
MACCLEOD, D. (1997) 'Schools “help squad” blitz', The Guardian, May.
MORTIMORE, P., SAMMONS, P., STOLL, L., LEWIS, D. and ECOB, R. (1988) School Matters, London: Open Books.
NORTH EAST LONDON EDUCATION ASSOCIATION (1995) 'The future of Hackney Downs School: A report to the Secretary of State for Education and Employment.'
O'CONNOR, M. (1996) 'Whose school is it anyway?', The Independent, 28 November, pp. 8-9.
O'CONNOR, M., HALES, E., DAVIES, J. and TOMLINSON, S. (1998) Hackney Downs: The School That Dared to Fight, London: Falmer Press.
OFSTED (1993) Access and Achievement in Urban Education, London: HMSO.
REYNOLDS, D. (1982) 'The search for effective schools', School Organisation, 2, 3, pp. 215-37.

-168-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
School Effectiveness for Whom? Challenges to the School Effectiveness and School Improvement Movements
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 197

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.