European Union Negotiations: Processes, Networks and Institutions

By Ole Elgström; Christer Jönsson | Go to book overview

7

Negotiations in European Union committees

Anders Sannerstedt


Introduction

The theme of this book is that decision making in the European Union can be seen as a continuous flow of partly interconnected multilateral negotiations. The European Union as a negotiation milieu can be characterized as a mix of cooperative negotiation behaviour and the negotiating parties' efforts at furthering their respective interests. However, even as we look for a specific EU negotiating style, we have to recognize that EU negotiations vary in several respects. We discover this when we compare negotiations in different issue areas. This chapter is comparative, too, but along another dimension: we will compare some aspects of negotiating behaviour in different types of working groups and committees within the EU political system. 1

Our point of departure is the distinction between three major types of working groups and committees: expert groups, Council working groups, and the implementation committees labelled 'comitology' (cf. Schaefer 1996). The expert groups play a part in the Commission's preparation of policy proposals. The Council's decisions are prepared by the Committee of Permanent Representatives (COREPER), and many different working groups prepare the COREPER decisions (cf. Bal 1995; Hayes-Renshaw and Wallace 1997:97-100). The comitology is part of the Commission's implementation of EU decisions. Its role is dual, though, since it was also intended to be the member states' instrument of control over the Commission in the implementation process (Dehousse 2003). Several different types of comitology committees can be discerned (advisory, managerial, regulatory); these committees have different competences and their rules for decision making vary (van der Knaap 1996; Dogan 1997). However, in this chapter we will largely ignore these differences (even though they appear theoretically important, cf. Steunenberg et al. 1996; Pollack 2003) and treat the comitology as one distinct type of EU committee. We do this because in our study we find very few differences between various types of comitology committees.

Members of these three committee types are appointed according to one and the same principle. As a rule, each member state is represented in each committee. The committees can thus be seen as arenas where the member states interact. These

-97-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
European Union Negotiations: Processes, Networks and Institutions
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 228

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.