Youth Crime and Youth Culture in the Inner City

By Bill Sanders | Go to book overview

Notes

1

Research in the inner city

1
I have renamed all the people, businesses and organisations in this research.
2
Becker (1970), for instance, discussed approaching individuals whose occupational position possibly placed them in contact with relevant information concerning the subject matter. He (1970:42) suggested, 'We can learn about the contingencies of deviant lives and organizations by studying the operations of the professionals who come into contact with them … specialists accumulate a great deal of practical experience and lore. They know what kinds of things go on, who is who in the deviant community and where he maybe found, relevant local history, and a host of other things a researcher can use.'
3
Many interpretations and definitions of the terms 'race' and 'ethnicity' exist (see, for example, Gilroy 1993; Goldberg 1993). For purposes here, the terms 'ethnic' and 'ethnicity' are employed as social constructs aiming to distinguish minority populations whose heritage originally stems from that outside of 'white' Europe.
4
Throughout the book citations from the interviews are employed that contain argot and idioms. Some variations emerged in the way respondents spelt some slang words and idiosyncrasies. In those cases the argot is spelt phonetically.
5
Hobbs (1988:10) said that during his research 'My family, friends, and neighbours were all potential sources of data. There was no social situation I encountered during the three years of this research that did not warrant some inductive analysis.'
6
Slang for somebody.
7
Warren (1988:19) concluded from her personal research experience that 'role taking in fieldwork is subsumed by a more interactive process in which respondents assign the field worker to what they see as his or her proper place in the social order.' In this sense, my role while employed at the shop held more of a 'co-worker' status as opposed to a researcher status (see also Adler and Adler 1991).
8
Lambeth Education Statistics 1997-98.
9
Data on Lambeth's ethnic demography presented in this section are derived from National Statistics Online, Census 2001, Profiles, Lambeth. Available online at www.statistics.gov.uk/census2001/profiles/00AY-A/asp. Downloaded 09/05/2003.
10
Data on police statistics in this section are from the Metropolitan Police Service, Performance Information Bureau (PIB) data for Recorded Persons Accused FY 2000-2002.
11
Information on The Movement for Justice was provided by informal conversations with volunteers who work for them. According to one of the volunteers, these quotes are within the manifesto of the Movement for Justice.
12
Cockney rhyming slang is where words are replaced with others that rhyme with them. In this case 'skunk', a type of cannabis, rhymes with 'punk'. For more on the history of British and Cockney rhyming slang see Kray's Slang (date not provided).

-205-

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Youth Crime and Youth Culture in the Inner City
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Figures viii
  • Tables ix
  • Acknowledgements x
  • Preface xi
  • Introduction xiii
  • 1 - Research in the Inner City 1
  • 2 - Lambeth 27
  • 3 - Robbery, Burglary, Theft 47
  • 4 - Drug Use and Drug Selling 77
  • 5 - Graffiti, Joyriding, Vandalism 94
  • 6 - Violence 116
  • 7 - Style, Group Behaviour, Interactions with the Police 135
  • 8 - The Moral Universes of Young People Who Have Offended 168
  • 9 - What is to Be Done About Crime and Delinquency in Lambeth? 195
  • Notes 205
  • References 215
  • Index 225
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