Multilateralism, German Foreign Policy, and Central Europe

By Claus Hofhansel | Go to book overview

Notes

1

Explaining support for multilateralism

1
Jeffrey J. Anderson, “Hard Interests, Soft Power, and Germany's Role in Europe, ” in Peter J. Katzenstein, ed., Tamed Power: Germany in Europe (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1997), p. 85.
2
See for example Jeffrey Anderson, German Unification and the Union of Europe (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999); John S. Duffield, “Political Culture and State Behavior: Why Germany Confounds Neorealism, ” International Organization 53 (Autumn 1999): 765-803.
3
For a good overview of Weimar foreign policy see Peter Krüger, Die Aussen-politik von Weimar, 2nd edn (Darmstadt: Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft, 1993).
4
Yuen Foong Khong, Analogies at War: Korea, Dien Bien Phu, and the Vietnam Decisions of 1965 (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1992).
5
Neorealist contributions to this debate include John J. Mearsheimer, “Back to the Future: Instability in Europe After the Cold War, ” in Sean M. Lynn-Jones, ed., The Cold War and After: Prospects for Peace (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1991), pp. 141-192; Christopher Layne, “The Unipolar Illusion: Why New Great Powers Will Rise, ” International Security 17 (Spring 1993): 5-51. A good example of institutional arguments is Jeffrey J. Anderson and John B. Goodman, “Mars or Minerva? A United Germany in a Post-Cold War Europe, ” in Robert O. Keohane, Joseph S. Nye and Stanley Hoffmann, eds, After the Cold War: International Institutions and State Strategies in Europe, 1989-1991 (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1993), pp. 23-62. For cultural arguments see, among others, Thomas U. Berger, Cultures of Antimilitarism: National Security in Germany and Japan (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1998) and John S. Duffield, World Power Forsaken: Political Culture, International Institutions, and German Security Policy After Unification (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1998).
6
Emil Nagengast, “Coming to Terms with a 'European Identity': The Sudeten Germans between Bonn and Prague, ” German Politics 5 (April 1996): 96-97.
7
Emil Nagengast, “Germany's New Ostpolitik and the Ideology of Multi-lateralism, ” International Politics 35 (September 1998): 325-326.
8
Patricia A. Davis, “National Interests Revisited: The German Case, ” German Politics & Society 16 (Spring 1998): 82-111.
9
Anderson, German Unification and the Union of Europe, p. 205.
10
Beverly Crawford, review of “Tamed Power” and “The German Predicament, ” American Political Science Review 92 (March 1998): 263.
11
Stewart Patrick, “Beyond Coalitions of the Willing: Assessing U.S. Multi-lateralism, ” Ethics & International Affairs 17, no. 1 (2003): 40.

-123-

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