Americans View Their Dust Bowl Experience

By John R. Wunder; Frances W. Kaye et al. | Go to book overview

MODERN BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE DUST BOWL

Jay H. Buckley

Billions of tons of blowing dirt from millions of acres of land symbolize the Dust Bowl and Depression of the 1930s. These black blizzards that swept over the Great Plains region were not caused by a natural disaster but by what adherents to an economic tradition did to intensify a natural occurrence during drought years. During the past 60 years, historiography has both elucidated and obscured the causes and effects of this recurrent phenomenon in analyzing the complexities of natural, human, and technical events that resulted in a tremendous displacement of earth, most of it from the Great Plains states. This bibliography lists the most recent articles and books associated with the Dust Bowl as well as providing a selection of some time-worn classics.


ARTICLES

Anderson, Clifford B. “The Metamorphosis of American Agrarian Idealism in the 1920s and 1930s.” Agricultural History 35 (October 1961): 182—188.

Ankli, Robert E. “Farm Income on the Great Plains and Canadian Prairies, 1920—1940.” Agricultural History 51 (January 1977): 92—103.

Arrington, Leonard J. “The New Deal in the West: A Preliminary Statistical Inquiry.” Pacific Historical Review 38 (August 1969): 311—16.

———. “Western Agriculture and the New Deal.” Agricultural History 44 (October 1970): 337—353.

Bauer, Patrick B. “Farm Mortgage Relief Legislation in Iowa During the Great Depression.” Annals of Iowa 50 (Summer 1989): 23—62.

Beddo, James B. “Depression and New Deal: Letters From the Plains.” Kan- sas Historical Quarterly 43 (Summer 1977): 140—153.

Benson, Jackson J. “ `To Tom Who Lived It': John Steinbeck and the Man From Weedpatch.” Journal of Modern Literature 5 (April 1976): 151—224.

Blackorby, Edward C. “William Lemke: Agrarian Radical and Union Party

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