The Bourgeois Experience: Victoria to Freud - Vol. 1

By Peter Gay | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

In writing this book, which has been in the making for a decade, I have accumulated obligations which it is a pleasant duty to discharge. I can only hope that, with the innumerable encounters I have enjoyed at lectures and at conferences, I have forgotten no one. That anonymous graduate student at Berkeley who steered me to the diary of Heinrich Graetz, and the friend (but which of them I can no longer remember) who informally gave me a title, "Glandular Christianity," which I will be using in the second volume, remind me just how far-flung and manyfold my debts are.

I have been immensely fortunate in invitations to test out my ideas in the making. I was privileged to be the first Ena H. Thompson Lecturer at Pomona College in 1980, and attempted, in these genial surroundings, to spell out the direction this study would take. Three years earlier, in 1977, I had the honor of delivering the Martin Rist Lectures at the Iliff School of Theology in Denver, renewing valued acquaintance with old friends and familiar places and rehearsing my thoughts on bourgeois culture in the nineteenth century. Harvey H. Potthoff put me in his debt, as always. The Whitten Lectures I gave at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario in the same year on the "Bourgeois Century" considerably assisted me also. A very different formulation of my ideas served me for the Christian Gauss Lectures in Criticism at Princeton in I979, where I underwent the kind of friendly, constructive grilling for which this lectureship is justly famous. The four Freud Lectures that I delivered at Yale in 1980 under the sponsorship of the Western New England Institute of Psychoanalysis and the Humanities Center at Yale University touched on some themes that I have canvassed in this volume. I also enjoyed the hospitality of the Concilium on International and Area Studies and of the Program on Modern Studies at my university. Lectures elsewhere, dating all the way back to the Spring of 1971, when I organized the first version of my thoughts about the bourgeois century under the auspices of the Institute of Historical Research in London, have proved exceedingly helpful in formulating and reformulating my ideas and in giving me the benefit of discussion, suggestions, and dissent, from

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The Bourgeois Experience: Victoria to Freud - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Books by Peter Gay *
  • The Bourgeois Experience - Victoria to Freud *
  • Contents *
  • Abbreviations *
  • General Introduction *
  • Orientations 3
  • One - The Strain of Definition 17
  • Two - Architects and Martyrs of Change 45
  • Education of the Senses *
  • Bourgeois Experiences, I - An Erotic Record 71
  • One - Sweet Bourgeois Communions 109
  • Two - Offensive Women and Defensive Men 169
  • Three - Pressures of Reality 226
  • Four - Learned Ignorance 278
  • Five - Carnal Knowledge 328
  • Six - Fortifications for the Self 403
  • Appendix 461
  • Bibliographical Essay 463
  • Illustrations and Sources 509
  • Acknowledgments 513
  • Index 517
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