Science and Golf II: Proceedings of the 1994 World Scientific Congress of Golf

By A. J. Cochran; M. R. Farrally | Go to book overview

12

A concise method of specifying the geometry and timing of golf swings

D.L. Linning

UK

Abstract

This paper provides a diagrammatic method for specifying the geometry and timing of the actions of any golf swing, good or bad, and illustrates the procedures involved by applying them to one particular swing within the family of effective swing styles.

Keywords: Golf Swing, Diagrammatic Specification, Geometry, Timing.


1 Method of Specification

Swing geometries are specified by diagrams which map swing paths of knee-joints, hip-joints, shoulder-joints, hands, and clubhead.

Timing is specified by Phase Diagrams in which the durations and sequences of swing actions are represented by individual horizontal lines on a base of time.


2 Key Features of the Specified Representative Swing Style

The swing style specified aims at simplicity and effectiveness and is based on a study of slow motion videos of tournament players plus some geometrical and dynamical analysis (not included here) of relationships between the various components of the body-arms-club system. However, it is not claimed that this swing is better than other swings within the family of effective swing styles.

Key features of the representative swing style include:

1 In the backswing the flows of muscular activation travel in parallel downwards through the body (that is, torso plus legs) and inwards through the arms. In the downswing the flows of activation are reversed and travel in parallel upwards through the body and outwards through the arms.

2 The head, or more precisely, the shoulders-centre is kept in or near to its address location throughout the swing.

3 In the backswing the hips are pivoted round a still centre within a plane at right angles to the torso axis.

4 In the downswing and follow-through the forward pivot of the hips is combined with a slide of the hip centre 45° left of target.

5 At impact the hips are about 45° open to the target and at completion they face the target with the right hip located where the left hip was at address.

Science and Golf II: Proceedings of the World Scientific Congress of Golf. Edited by A.J. Cochran and M.R. Farrally. Published in 1994 by E & FN Spon, London. ISBN 0 419 18790 1

-77-

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