Science and Golf II: Proceedings of the 1994 World Scientific Congress of Golf

By A. J. Cochran; M. R. Farrally | Go to book overview

43

Kick back effect of club-head at impact

M. Masuda and S. Kojima

Shonan Institute of Technology, Fujisawa, Japan

Abstract

This paper reports the experimental results of kick back effect of the club-head at impact. The kick back effect comes with a newly discovered behavior of the shaft near the club-head at impact. To make clear this effect, eight strain gauges are attached along the shaft and very fast output signals at impact are recorded and analyzed. Thus the experiment revealed the propagation of a deformation wave from the club head to the grip end with the sound velocity, approximately 10Km/s. At the same time, the kick back effect has been observed.

Keywords: Golf Shaft Vibration, Frequency Resonance, Driving Distance.


1. Introduction

For many years, it has been talked among professional and low handicap players that the club-head chases the ball just bouncing out from the club-head after impact. We called it the kick back effect.

When the club-head impacts the ball, the ball is deformed and at the same time the shaft bends near the clubhead as shown in Fig. 1(a). After a very short time (several hundred micro-second) the shaft will bend again but in the reverse direction and kick backs the ball. This is a kind of local vibration of shaft caused by the impact with the ball. The vibrational deformation will propagate along the shaft with the sound velocity towards the grip. If the frequency of such local shaft vibration would just meet the characteristic frequency of the ball, then pushing the ball by the club-head will synchronize with the ball bouncing out from the club-head as shown in Fig. 1(c). This is the kick back effect.

Supposing the moment when the club head travels with the ball during impact as shown in Fig. (b), a part of initial momentum of club-head is transferred to the ball and the velocity of club-head decreases by the following equation,

Science and Golf II: Proceedings of the World Scientific Congress of Golf. Edited by A.J. Cochran and M.R. Farrally. Published in 1994 by E & FN Spon, London. ISBN 0 419 18790 1

-284-

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