Science and Golf II: Proceedings of the 1994 World Scientific Congress of Golf

By A. J. Cochran; M. R. Farrally | Go to book overview

78

Reducing the environmental impact of golf course insect management

R.L. Brandenburg

Professor, Department of Entomology, North Carolina State
University, Raleigh, NC, USA

Abstract

Concern over the environmental impact of golf course management has triggered many new approaches to pest management. Pesticide selection in concert with the site of application can reduce problems associated with drift, runoff, and other contaminations. New application technology can help reduce drift, surface residues, runoff risk, exposure to wildlife, and odor. Many new biological control agents are available for managing turfgrass insect pests. These vary from entomogenous nematodes to the use of Bacillus thuringiensis sprays. Improved ability to monitor and predict insects helps manage the pests.

Keywords: Integrated Pest Management, Pesticides, Insect Management, Turf Pest Management, Pesticide Application.


1 Introduction

While the golf course industry in the United States continues to grow at a record pace, the concerns associated with such growth also increase at an equal or greater pace. Some concerns such as those expressed through the recent banning by the Environmental Protection Agency of diazinon on golf courses due to bird kills have been legitimate. Other concerns, perhaps less well documented, are perceived as equal or greater risks by various environmental groups. This increased concern over the potential environmental consequences of pesticide use and increasing regulation of pesticides on turfgrass comes in light of more demand for high quality turfgrass on golf courses by the public.

The concepts of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) are well established and have been recently reviewed for turfgrass (Tashiro 1987, Potter and Braman 1991). While IPM has been quite successful in agricultural crops, its effective use in turfgrass is more difficult. Reasons for this include: a) the perennial nature of turfgrass,

Science and Golf II: Proceedings of the World Scientific Congress of Golf. Edited by A.J. Cochran and M.R. Farrally. Published in 1994 by E & FN Spon, London. ISBN 0 419 18790 1

-519-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Science and Golf II: Proceedings of the 1994 World Scientific Congress of Golf
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 643

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.