Science and Golf II: Proceedings of the 1994 World Scientific Congress of Golf

By A. J. Cochran; M. R. Farrally | Go to book overview

80

Course design with precision and control

R.A. Ryder

Ryder Golf Services, Hampshire, UK

Abstract

This paper describes how computer aided design (CAD) can be and has been of benefit to golf course architects.

With “natural” golfing sites becoming very rare the golf course architect has increasingly to compromise because of difficult terrain, conflicting local interests and budgetary constraints. Traditional design skills need to be supported by modern techniques which enhance precision and control.

CAD enables the existing site and the proposed golfing landforms to be accurately modelled and analysed. Computer generated course, golf hole or feature prototypes may be evaluated for environmental impact, golfing quality and cost and if necessary modified before commitment to major development and construction costs.

The paper identifies the scope for CAD in course design, describes the basic techniques involved and gives recent case studies. In conclusion the cost effectiveness of using CAD in golf course design is reviewed.

Keywords: CAD, Course Design, Computer Aided Design, Digital Ground Modelling, Digital Terrain Modelling, DGM, DTM.


1 Introduction

Designing courses to challenge and stimulate all types of golfer requires imagination. Indeed, for natural golfing terrain of the links and heathland variety imagination may be said to be the overiding requirement, as visible human intervention should be kept to a minimum. However, sites on ideal terrain are increasingly rare and of more significance than a natural suitability for golf will almost certainly be proximity to centres of population, major transportation routes, or holiday resorts.

Although imaginative design can transform a less than sympathetic site, if the proposals involve major site alterations development costs can escalate. Extensive earthmoving may be envisaged to make steep or rocky hillsides playable, a featureless locality challenging, or to provide storage lakes for irrigation. Compliance with environmental and land use planning conditions and integration with the local infrastructure may present complex problems. In such cases the golf course architect can benefit from the precision and control available via computer aided design (CAD), whereby alternative solutions may be evaluated quickly in terms of form, function and cost prior to final commitment to major development and construction expenditures.

Science and Golf II: Proceedings of the World Scientific Congress of Golf. Edited by A.J. Cochran and M.R. Farrally. Published in 1994 by E & FN Spon, London. ISBN 0 419 18790 1

-534-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Science and Golf II: Proceedings of the 1994 World Scientific Congress of Golf
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 643

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.