Science and Golf II: Proceedings of the 1994 World Scientific Congress of Golf

By A. J. Cochran; M. R. Farrally | Go to book overview

81

The role of management planning and ecological evaluation within the golf course environment

A.-M. Brennan

The Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology, The University,
Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NX, UK

Abstract

This paper reviews the basic principles of management planning and their role in golf course management. It also considers the nature of management for areas with multiple uses. In addition to this, the paper includes an overview of ecological survey and evaluation techniques such as habitat mapping protocols, sieve mapping, presence/absence recording, abundance scoring and community analysis along with evaluation methods such as the Nature Conservation Review (NCR) criteria. The role of evaluation procedure as part of Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) is also discussed.

Keywords: Environmental Evaluation, Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA), Golf and Environment, Management Planning.


1 Introduction

The nature and extent of the nature conservation resource provided by golf courses has been well documented (Brennan 1992, Dair and Schofield 1990). In Great Britain over 100 courses lie partially or wholly within Sites of Special Scientific Interest. An awareness of golf courses as part of the 'wider countryside' and their wildlife value has lead to initiatives which bring golf and nature conservation together (Nature Conservancy Council 1989). Golf courses are ideally suited to pro-active conservation as, unlike many other areas, management rather than cultivation is the primary objective. As a result, much of the course is available for wildlife.


2 Management planning

As with any human endeavour, conservation management requires foresight and planning. Not only to ensure that human and material resources are not

Science and Golf II: Proceedings of the World Scientific Congress of Golf. Edited by A.J. Cochran and M.R. Farrally. Published in 1994 by E & FN Spon, London. ISBN 0 419 18790 1

-540-

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