Science and Golf II: Proceedings of the 1994 World Scientific Congress of Golf

By A. J. Cochran; M. R. Farrally | Go to book overview

92

Golf, media and change in Australia

B. Parker

Australian Golf Digest, Sydney, Australia

Abstract

This paper will discuss the relationship between golf and the media, specifically in Australia, and what are the underlying reasons for its change and the consequences for its delivery to the golfing public. Firstly the paper will discuss the changes in the way golf has been reported and what affect this has had on its delivery. It will then analyse the relationship between television and golf-who has access, at what cost and what coverage is given to golf. Finally the paper will assess who controls the media in golf and discuss whether it is accessible and do the public get the full picture.

Keywords: Australia, Media, Journalists, Newspapers, Television, Sponsorship


1 Growth of golf reportage

Prior to and immediately after World War II little coverage had been given to golf in Australian newspapers. During the late 1940s and the early 1950s most coverage that was given to golf concentrated mainly in Sydney with Jack Simons or in Melbourne with Jack Dillon. These were only part-time writers but respected as specialist golf writers. Most sporting writers, golf included, had to spread their time among a number of other popular sports such as rugby and cricket (Tresidder, 1993). At this time Australian golf was dominated by the likes of Norman von Nida, Ossie Pickworth, Eric Cremin and, later, Peter Thomson and Kel Nagle. Despite the success of these players in Australia and, to some extent, overseas their performances did little to grab headlines in the major metropolitan newspapers. Reporting these tournaments was made easier, compared to today, because golfing talent was reasonably scarce. Golf writers would walk the fairways and watch the leading players' every movement, safe in the knowledge that the winner would most likely come from one of the two final groups (Tresidder, 1993).

Science and Golf II: Proceedings of the World Scientific Congress of Golf. Edited by A.J. Cochran and M.R. Farrally. Published in 1994 by E & FN Spon, London. ISBN 0 419 18790 1

-626-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Science and Golf II: Proceedings of the 1994 World Scientific Congress of Golf
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 643

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.