Arts Administration

By John Pick; Malcolm Anderton | Go to book overview

Leisure and Recreation Management
4th Edition G. Torkildsen, Leisure and Recreation Management Consultant, Harlow, UKREVIEWS OF PREVIOUS EDITIONS

“This is an important book that neatly fills a gaping void. There is no equivalent up to date text…[It] should be of great interest both to practising leisure managers and to students of recreation and leisure.”

Surveyor

“George has done it!…this book is a must, a life saver for undergraduate and postgraduate students and a mine of reference material for the practitioner.”

Sport and Leisure

“…essential reading for those involved at all levels in the planning, administration and management of recreation.”

British Book News

“…much needed and long overdue.”-Tourism Management

Leisure and Recreation Management remains the only book to clearly demonstrate the link between theory and practice in leisure and recreation with the student in mind. Successfully applying management principles and strategies to the actual needs of people, the book gives clear explanations of key concepts and trends within the industry. Every chapter in the new edition has been revised to include new material, and the overall structure has also been revised to make 4 sections. Specifically:
• Part I has extended chapters on play, recreation and the needs of people.
• Part II gives leisure trends new treatment and has additional material on planning and government.
• Part III deals with leisure providers and addresses the substantial changes to legislation affecting the public and private sectors. Reference is made to the legacy of CCT and the author looks ahead to Best Value.
• Part IV has updated material on management, operational issues and training.

This 4th edition of Leisure and Recreation Management is essential reading for all students at the undergraduate level and should be on the shelf of every good leisure library in the UK.

Contents: Illustrations. Preface and acknowledgements. Introduction, structure and significance of the book. Part One Leisure and the needs of people. Play, children and the community. Recreation. Leisure-towards a philosophy and understanding of its evolution. People's needs and factors that influence participation. Part Two Leisure trends, planning and government. Planning for leisure. The government and leisure agencies in the United Kingdom. Part Three The leisure providers. Leisure provision in the public sector. Leisure provision in the voluntary sector. Leisure provision in the commercial sector. Management. Part Four The management of leisure. Programming leisure and recreation services and facilities. Marketing of leisure and recreation. Organisation of major events. Staffing and staff structures. Leisure and recreation management education and training. Towards effective leisure and recreation management: some conclusion. Discussion. Index.

246×174:592pp: illus.109 line drawings and 18 b+w photographs Paperback: 0-419-22940-X

-180-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Arts Administration
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - The Arts 16
  • 2 - Arts Organizations 27
  • 3 - Development of Arts Administration Systems 39
  • References 51
  • 4 - The Context 52
  • References 63
  • 5 - Government Intervention: Supports and Constraints 64
  • References 77
  • 6 - Arts Programming 78
  • 7 - Arts Marketing 92
  • References 106
  • 8 - Development of Arts Audiences 107
  • 9 - Arts Administration: Conclusions 116
  • 10 - Case Studies 131
  • Appendix A 155
  • Appendix B 168
  • Appendix C 170
  • Index 173
  • Leisure and Recreation Management 180
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 180

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.