Brain Train: Studying for Success

By Richard Palmer | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Concerning the original version of this book, I would like to repeat my gratitude to Bernard Chibnall, sometime Head of Sussex University's Media Service Unit, whose courses for teachers first kindled my interest in Study Skills, and to Andrew Husband, Tom Keeley and Tim Kirkup for their interest and encouragement. I am also indebted to my then co-author Chris Pope and to Christopher Turk, who wrote the chapter on Computers and Study and whose overall advice was invaluable.

Since then many people have helped me enormously. Several institutions have engaged me as a consultant: I am grateful to Philip Stott, David Boyd and Phil Jagger of the School of Oriental & African Studies; Wendy Pollard and the Open University's London Regional Arts Club; Kevin Dillow and Elizabeth Cairncross of Christ's Hospital; and above all Jacky Max and Steven Snell of the NatWest Group. Thanks are due too to my Bedford colleagues David Neal and Philip Young for their wise help on Part Four, to Peter and Fina Bundell, Rob Kapadia, Jane Parry and Michael and Louise Tucker for their valuable comments, and, especially, to Roger Allen, Colin Brezicki and Martin Smalley for their ideas and provision of material. It is also a pleasure to thank Elaine Leek for her expert assistance in preparing the manuscript, Chapman & Hall's Commissioning Editor Philip Read and Frances Cornford in the production department, and Madeleine Metcalfe, my former (and excellent) editor. And I have indeed been fortunate in being able to draw on the services of good friends Bob Eadie for the chapter on Computers and John Penny for his wonderful drawings.

Most of all I thank Annie my wife. She devised and drafted much of Part Four from her extensive experience in the field; her cogent advice throughout has been priceless; and without her good humour and loving tolerance during my countless hours in front of the word-processor this book would never have survived.

-xix-

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