Regulating Sex: The Politics of Intimacy and Identity

By Elizabeth Bernstein; Laurie Schaffner | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 1

Liberalism and Social Movement Success:

The Case of United States Sodomy Statutes

MARY BERNSTEIN 1

In 1960, every state in the United States had a sodomy law that banned certain consensual sex acts between adults in private. In addition to statutes regarding anal sex, the sodomy statutes, either by express statutory language or judicial interpretation, prohibited any oral-genital contact. In some states, these laws applied to opposite-sex as well as same-sex couples, and to married as well as single people (Apasu-Gbotsu et al. 1986). During the last half-century, however, these laws have primarily been used to control lesbians and gay men, despite the fact that they were originally enacted to prohibit any nonprocreative sex (Halley 1994; Greenberg 1988; M. Bernstein 2004). Lesbians and gay men have been arrested in undercover sting operations in gay bars, cruising places, and hotel rooms, as well as in their own bedrooms as recently as the 1980s and 1990s (Robson 1992). Sodomy laws have also signified support for a heteronormative order that posits distinct gender and sexual roles for men and women (M. Bernstein 2001).

How should social movement theorists assess the success of movements that seek to profoundly alter dominant cultural values as well as achieve concrete legal change? Political opportunity theory along with much of the social movement literature tells us that changing laws or policies, in this case the sodomy statutes, constitutes movement success. But should we count these legal victories as successes when, rather than challenging the symbolic dimensions of these laws that discursively mark lesbian and gay sexuality and identity as

-3-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Regulating Sex: The Politics of Intimacy and Identity
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 313

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.