Collected Writings of J.A.A. Stockwin: The Politics and Political Environment of Japan

By J. A. A. Stockwin | Go to book overview

First published in Asian Affairs, Vol. XIV, Part III, October 1983


28

Japanese Politics: New Directions or the Story as Before? *

THE EMERGENCE late in 1982 of a new Japanese prime minister, makes this an opportune time to assess the long term development and direction of the politics of Japan. People in this country are well aware that Japan since the war has become an economic superpower, thus confounding the sceptics who believed in the late 1940s and early 1950s that the prospects for economic recovery were remote. About the politics of Japan the general level of awareness in Britain and Europe is relatively low. This is not so surprising because most people are understandably little concerned about political details of countries remote from the part of the world they happen to inhabit, but in the case of Japan it is not simply a problem of unconcern about detail, but rather of a general absence of 'focus'. What interests people, but what they often find hard to grasp, is not so much who holds what portfolio in the Nakasone cabinet, or which political parties stand for what set of policies, but more general questions such as how Japanese politics actually works, what is its driving force, is it 'democratic' in a recognisable sense, does the electorate have the same sort of political role enjoyed by, say, the British electorate, who really exercises power and makes basic decisions, how far is the government involved in the running of the economy, is there a 'hands-off' laissez faire attitude to the economy by government, or should we speak, as some observers have done, of 'Japan Incorporated'?

There is another set of questions about the politics of Japan which I frequently find myself being asked, which relates to the role which an economically vigorous and effective Japan might play in the complex and mysterious world of the late 1980s and 1990s. Concern with this question seems to me to relate to two sorts of perception which people commonly have. The first is a feeling-if I can put it as vaguely as that-that a nation which possesses virtually the second largest economy in the world would be unusual if it did not match its economic strength with corresponding levels of military capacity. Is

* Lecture given to the Royal Society for Asian Affairs, London 23 February 1983.

-363-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Collected Writings of J.A.A. Stockwin: The Politics and Political Environment of Japan
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 551

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.