The Courts of Pre-Colonial South India: Material Culture and Kingship

By Jennifer Howes | Go to book overview

2

VIJAYANAGARA AND MADURAI

Many of the forms found in south Indian palace architecture have their precedents in the courtly architecture of Vijayanagara, the 'City of Victory'. [Plate 16]. During the sixteenth century, Vijayanagara was the ceremonial centre of an empire bearing the same name. The archaeological site which we find today still contains the remains of buildings which were part of the city's palace. These fragmentary structures are the earliest extant courtly monuments in the south of India. When they are viewed alongside the seventeenth-century courtly monuments at Madurai, stylistic links between the courtly architecture of the two places can be discerned.

The purpose of this chapter is to look at what we know about the material culture of the Vijayanagara court in order to establish the stylistic and ideological influences which were at play in the courtly monuments of southern Tamil Nadu. By looking at this material culture, the formal and hierarchical continuities which occur in the courtly architecture of the Telugu and Tamil regions will hopefully become apparent. This link does not end with stylistic similarities between buildings. Because Madurai was a sub-state of Vijayanagara, these two sites were connected through their membership in the same segmentary state. Madurai's participation in Vijayanagara's ritual sovereignty was a key part of Madurai's courtly ideology.

Archaeological evidence indicates that Madurai was an important south Indian city long before Vijayanagara was built. From roughly the third century until 1310 Madurai was an important city to the Pandyas. 58 Pandyan courtly epics extol Madurai as a city of extreme beauty, and connect the Pandya royal lineage with Minakshi, the tutelary goddess of Madurai, and her consort, Sundareshvara (a form of Shiva). By the thirteenth century the Pandya Dynasty was weakening. Rivalries over succession were handicapping the rule of areas under Pandya control. Added to this, the breakdown of the Chola Empire in the mid-thirteenth century caused northern Tamil Nadu to fragment into smaller autonomous political areas, resulting in rivalries between political units of equal size. It is said that the Pandya king at Madurai asked the Delhi Sultanate to assist in strengthening the Madurai

-27-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Courts of Pre-Colonial South India: Material Culture and Kingship
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vi
  • Preface xiii
  • Acknowledgements xiv
  • Abbreviations xvi
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - The Manasara and Pre-Colonial Kingship in South India 8
  • 2 - Vijayanagara and Madurai 27
  • 3 - The Emergence of Ramnad Kingdom 71
  • 4 - Paintings in the Ramalinga Vilasam 90
  • 5 - Ramnad Palace 127
  • 6 - Ramnad Town 159
  • 7 - Ramnad Kingdom 174
  • 8 - Ramnad's Rivals 192
  • Conclusion 226
  • Glossary 229
  • Notes 233
  • Bibliography 244
  • Index 255
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 263

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.