Human Factors in Consumer Products

By Neville Stanton | Go to book overview

Foreword

There is a saying in the design profession-'If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the problem'. This is never more true than when applied to the design of products. Designers have the potential to be part of the solution. Too often in the past, designers have simply exacerbated the problem-designing furniture, products and space-planning schemes that make matters worse.

We all know the role that good ergonomics can play in creating a better, healthier living and working space. I would say that good design and good ergonomics go hand in hand. Ergonomics is an essential factor in making the broader contribution of design solutions in our lives work more effectively.

But then perhaps you would expect me to say this-as Design Director at the Design Council, an organisation dedicated to improving the prosperity and well-being of the UK through inspiring the best use of design.

I welcome this book and hope it provides valuable insights into how designers, engineers and ergonomists can work together in designing a better world to live and work in. Only by adopting this team approach, and with access to the latest knowledge can we expect businesses to embrace best practice and compete successfully in world markets.

As living and working patterns change, through the enabling potential of technology, we need, more than ever, well designed products that improve the quality of life as well as the prosperity of those manufacturing companies. Best practice in product design is all too rare. Whilst notable exceptions amongst companies design delightfully refined, well conceived products that do actually improve the way we live and work, there are still many infuriating products that fill our lives with frustration.

-xv-

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