Human Performance in Planning and Scheduling

By Bart MacCarthy; John Wilson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER THREE

Lessons from the Factory Floor
Kenneth N. McKay
3.1

INTRODUCTION
This chapter is a retrospective attempt to summarize the insights and opinions the author has accumulated since being challenged by John Buzacott in 1985 with the question: What is Scheduling? In a sense this paper is an update to McKay et al. (1988). The author has spent fifteen years studying the production control problem, attempting to bridge the gap between theory and practice. Simply stated, the aim has been
• to develop an understanding of what is and what is not scheduling and what is needed to help scheduling and planning in the real world.

During the time span of this extended research agenda, a variety of activities have transpired: scheduling systems have been built and deployed; quantitative models have been built and studied; the scheduling task looked at upside down and back to front; many discussions held with scheduling vendors and research colleagues, and many days spent in manufacturing facilities, watching and working with schedulers. While the subject matter has always been production control, the research methodology has been multi- and inter-disciplinary. Organizational behavior, sociotechnology, cognitive science, operations management, and information systems have been the domains from which field methods, modelling concepts, and inspiration have been derived. The research agenda has been described as unique, exploratory, inspirational and revolutionary by some, foolhardy and a waste of time by others. The agenda is not complete yet and the understanding is far from in a desired state-the end is not even in sight. As schedulers say, time will reveal all.

When the 1988 paper was written, personal computer based tools were in their infancy, AI was a promising area, and much work was being done on scheduling heuristics and algorithms. Many researchers were optimistic that the new and improved scheduling heuristics and related search concepts would be successfully embedded in the computer-based tools, which would then in turn be widely used in job shops: computers would generate the optimal or near-optimal schedules which would then be executed. Such an outcome would have justified the thousands of research efforts and supported the thousands of claims of relevancy. While this has happened in certain sectors such as process industries, single large machine problems, and at different levels of planning such as supply chain analysis, this has not happened for job shops. In this chapter the job shop will be the focus, as will the scheduling task. Most job shop style factories are still scheduling and planning

-45-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Human Performance in Planning and Scheduling
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 470

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.