Cities and the Creative Class

By Richard Florida | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This book reflects a decade's worth of research and writing and at least three decades of thinking. A huge number of intellectual debts are accumulated over such a period. I am grateful to have had a series of patient funders who invested in the development of these ideas. In particular, I'd like to thank the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation for supporting my work over the better part of two decades. The Heinz Philanthropies supported my professorship at Carnegie Mellon and a number of key projects. I also benefited from funding from the Richard King Mellon Foundation and the Pennsylvania Technology Investment Authority among other groups. Carnegie Mellon University's Heinz School of Public Policy and Management, and more recently the Software Industry Center, provided a supportive environment in which to conduct this work.

My single largest debt is to my parents, who invested virtually everything they had in my intellectual development, and to my brother, Robert, who was my earliest partner in the process of discovery.

I am hugely indebted to the incredible teachers, professors, and mentors I had the good fortune to come across as a student. Martin Kenney has had the greatest impact on my thinking. Gordon Clark has been a particularly great friend and teacher. Ashish Arora, Wesley Cohen, Harvey Brooks, and Lewis Branscomb helped deepen my understanding of the innovation process. Jane Jacobs has taught me more than I could ever have imagined about the nature of cities and places.

-vii-

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Cities and the Creative Class
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - Cities and the Creative Class 27
  • Part I - Talent 47
  • 3 - Competing in the Age of Talent 49
  • 4 - The Economic Geography of Talent 87
  • Part II - Tolerance 111
  • 5 - Bohemia and Economic Geography 113
  • 6 - Technology and Tolerance 129
  • Part III - Place 141
  • 7 - The University, Talent, and Quality of Place 143
  • 9 - Open Questions 171
  • Appendix 177
  • Notes 181
  • Index 193
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