Telling the Truth about Aboriginal History

By Bain Attwood | Go to book overview

NOTES

In this book, the references to the sources that have been used for each point have generally been provided in notes at the end of each paragraph, rather than in notes at the end of each sentence.


Introduction
1
David Thelen, 'History After the Enola Gay Controversy: An Introduction', Journal of American History, vol. 82, no. 3, 1995, 1033.
2
In the case of the United States, another problematic race history, that of slavery, seems to have largely displaced that of aboriginal peoples in the historical consciousness of most non-aboriginal Americans.
3
In an era where the political landscape has changed so much, it no longer makes as much sense to apply terms (such as 'the left') to characterise positions on a political spectrum. This is evident in the increasingly common use of the term 'left liberal' (which confuses what are still very different political philosophies and programs). Throughout this book, I use 'new conservatives' to refer to historical 'revisionists' and their supporters, since the contradiction implied by this term conveys the ways in which their position has some aspects of conservatism and others that depart radically from this political tradition.
4
Since Windschuttle's first writings on Aboriginal history were published, some major public debates have occurred, mostly in Melbourne and Sydney. They include: Gould's Book Arcade, Sydney, 12 November 2000; Lateline, ABC TV, 16 April 2001; National Press Club, Canberra, 19 April 2001; 'Social History, Aboriginal History and the Pursuit of Truth', Blackheath Philosophy Forum, 1 March 2003; 'White Settlement in Australia: Violent Conquest or Benign Colonisation?', Melbourne Trades Hall, 5 March 2003; 'Telling Histories', Dechaineaux Theatre, Hobart, 29 March 2003; 'Roundtable on

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Telling the Truth about Aboriginal History
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Telling the Truth About Aboriginal History *
  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Illustrations vi
  • Preface vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Part I - Present 9
  • 1 - Nation 11
  • 2 - Democracy 36
  • 3 - Politics 60
  • Part II - Past 85
  • 4 - Genocide 87
  • 5 - War 106
  • 6 - Law 124
  • 7 - Culture 136
  • Part III - Future 155
  • 8 - History 157
  • 9 - Memory 170
  • 10 - Truth and Recognition 184
  • Acknowledgments 197
  • Notes 198
  • Index 259
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