In the Footsteps of the Ancients: The Origins of Humanism from Lovato to Bruni

By Ronald G. Witt | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

In memoriam Paul Oskar Kristeller (1905–1999) Sibi et post eum ascendere volentibus viam aperuit.

In the course of the twenty-three years since I first conceived of taking up this project, I have depended heavily on the generosity of a large intellectual community in multifarious ways, but because this volume embodies only half of the original design, I postpone mentioning those who contributed principally to the still unfinished first and earlier part. The present book could not have been written without the expert advice of Francis Newton and Diskin Clay of Duke's Department of Classical Studies. In the case of Francis Newton, my debt goes back to the beginning of my research on early humanism and before. James Hankins, John Headley, Kenneth Gouwens, Riccardo Fubini, Majorie Curry Woods, and Paul Gaziano read the entire manuscript, each at different stages of its development. Francesca Santoro L'Hoir, Giuseppe Mazzotta, Timothy Kircher, and Marcello Simonetta willingly gave their comments on chapters 3, 5, 6, and 10 respectively. On specific points I had recourse to the expertise and assistance of Felicia Traub, Patricia Osmond, Robert Bjork, Peter Burian, Mark Sosower, Lucia Stadter, and Edward Mahoney. I am deeply grateful to all these scholars for the corrections and improvements they have made. A presentation of a late version of the manuscript in one of the Duke History Department's “Conversations with Colleagues” was extremely profitable, as was a similar presentation to the Triangle Intellectual History Seminar.

I am deeply in debt to two decades of Duke University Staff members: Dorothy Sapp and Betty Cowan in the 1980s and Jenna Golnik, Andrea Long, and Deborah Carver in the 1990s. Without them I would never have gotten through the series of emergencies plaguing a sometimes absent-minded and technologically naive researcher. Of the dozens of libraries I have visited over the years, I would like to single out for special thanks the staffs of the Bibliotheque nationale of Paris, the Biblioteca nazionale and Biblioteca riccardiana of Florence, the libraries of the American Academy in Rome and Harvard's Villa I Tatti in Florence, the Newberry Library, the Biblioteca

-vii-

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In the Footsteps of the Ancients: The Origins of Humanism from Lovato to Bruni
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Table of Contents *
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Abbreviations xi
  • Chapter One - Introduction 1
  • Chapter Two - The Birth of the New Aesthetic 31
  • Chapter Three - Padua and the Origins of Humanism 81
  • Chapter Four - Albertino Mussato and the Second Generation 117
  • Chapter Five - Florence and Vernacular Learning 174
  • Chapter Six - Petrarch, Father of Humanism? 230
  • Chapter Seven - Coluccio Salutati 292
  • Chapter Eight - The Revival of Oratory 338
  • Chapter Nine - Leonardo Bruni 392
  • Chapter Ten - The First Ciceronianism 443
  • Chapter Eleven - Conclusion 495
  • Appendix 509
  • Bibliography 515
  • Index of Persons 549
  • Index of Places 556
  • Index of Subjects 558
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