In the Footsteps of the Ancients: The Origins of Humanism from Lovato to Bruni

By Ronald G. Witt | Go to book overview

CHAPTER SEVEN
COLUCCIO SALUTATI

In Coluccio Salutati (1331–1406), the leader of the fourth generation of Italian humanists, the communal loyalties characteristic of the first two generations merged with the Christian humanism of the cosmopolitan Petrarch. Born in 1331 in Stignano, on the border between Florentine and Lucchese territory, Salutati received all of Ms formal education in Bologna, where Ms exiled family lived until 1350/51. Married in 1366, widowed in 1371, and married a second time in 1374, Salutati fathered at least eleven children, nine boys and one girl. As a result of his thirty-one years in the lucrative office of chancellor of the Florentine Republic, from 1375 until Ms death in 1406, he earned not only international honors but enough money to indulge Ms passion for book collecting without threatening his family's financial security. Through a vast correspondence with learned men in Italy and France, he turned Ms study in Florence into a kind of clearinghouse for news about manuscripts, recent humanist writings, and employment opportunities for job-seeking scholars throughout Italy and northern Europe. By the time of Ms death, the vital center of the humanist movement, itinerant in the previous generation depending on Petrarch's places of residence, became anchored in the Tuscan city.


1

Although Salutati provides little information about Ms school years, he did claim Pietro da Moglio (d. 1383), one of the leading pedagogues of the day, as Ms teacher. Probably a student of Giovanni del Virgilio, da Moglio tried to keep abreast of humanistic currents. At least late in life, he maintained a correspondence with Petrarch.1

____________________
1
Salutati describes Pietro da Moglio as “meus in adolescentia … premonitor”: Salutati, Epistolario di Coluccio Salutati, ed. Francesco Novati, 4 vols., in FSI, vols. 15– 18 (Rome, 1891–1911), 1:115. On da Moglio, see Giuseppe Billanovich, “Giovanni del Virgilio, Pietro da Moglio, Francesco da Fiano, ” IMU6 (1963): 203–34 and IMU 1 (1964): 279–324; and Giuseppe Billanovich and G. M. Monti, “Una nuova fonte per la storia della scuola de grammatica e retorica nell'Italia del Trecento, ” IMU 17 (1979): 367–412. Chapter 7 is largely a summary of my two books on Salutati: Salutati and His Letters (1976) and Hercules (1983). I have kept footnotes to a minimum here and referred the reader to those monographs for detailed references. My former position on Salutati's training with da Moglio, found in Witt, Hercules, 15–19, has been substantially revised.

-292-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
In the Footsteps of the Ancients: The Origins of Humanism from Lovato to Bruni
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Table of Contents *
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Abbreviations xi
  • Chapter One - Introduction 1
  • Chapter Two - The Birth of the New Aesthetic 31
  • Chapter Three - Padua and the Origins of Humanism 81
  • Chapter Four - Albertino Mussato and the Second Generation 117
  • Chapter Five - Florence and Vernacular Learning 174
  • Chapter Six - Petrarch, Father of Humanism? 230
  • Chapter Seven - Coluccio Salutati 292
  • Chapter Eight - The Revival of Oratory 338
  • Chapter Nine - Leonardo Bruni 392
  • Chapter Ten - The First Ciceronianism 443
  • Chapter Eleven - Conclusion 495
  • Appendix 509
  • Bibliography 515
  • Index of Persons 549
  • Index of Places 556
  • Index of Subjects 558
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 565

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.