academic ethics, and “professorial ethics.” Academic ethics is a form of institutional ethics (just as is business ethics or research ethics); professorial ethics is a form of professional ethics. Neither of these is congruent with academic freedom which is mostly about the rights of academics (professors and students), not about their obligations (except insofar as the rights carry obligations).

In Part II, Chapters 3-6, focuses on research ethics. Chapter 3 offers a survey of the field, both historical and topical. Why now? Why these topics? Chapter 4 considers the possibility of deriving special standards for researchers entirely from consideration of the purpose, function, or status of “science” or “scientific research.” It concludes that such an attempt will fail. What is required are conventions, whether specific to a particular field of research or discipline or covering scientific research generally. A code of ethics is not a discovery but an invention. Chapter 5 considers a specific set of problems posed by the increasingly close relationship between business and university research. What standards should be imposed on that relationship? Why? Chapter 6 considers in depth a case, a plagiarism complaint, in which academic ethics seems to need both new standards and new procedures.

Having thus defined the field of practical ethics, we are ready for Part III, Chapters 7-10, the subject of which is teaching practical ethics. Chapter 7 describes a program to integrate professional (and institutional) ethics into a wide range of courses across the university, everything from first-year calculus to senior design or research projects. Since “the case method” plays a large part in this program-and, indeed, is now the preferred method of teaching professional ethics-Chapter 8 attempts to explain what the case method is, ending up not with one method but several. Chapter 8 also illustrates important differences between methods and provides considerable advice on how to develop and use cases. Chapter 9 considers a problem of professorial ethics that teaching practical ethics seems to generate. Teaching ethics changes teaching-or at least brings out parts of teaching we tend to forget. Chapter 9 suggests how much remains to be done to clarify the ethical presuppositions of university teaching in particular-and academic ethics in general. Chapter 10 argues against one approach to a certain range of questions now hotly contested. Trying to think of questions of “sexual ethics” as closely related is likely to make them harder, not easier, to resolve.

Few books owe no debts, but this one owes more than the usual. Many are paid in individual endnotes. Three, I think, deserve a

-viii-

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