Social Policy, the Media, and Misrepresentation

By Bob Franklin | Go to book overview

Chapter 1

Soft-soaping the public?

The government and media promotion of social policy

Bob Franklin

On 17 September 1998, the Guardian published a rather curious and enigmatic photograph of David Blunkett enjoying a pint of beer, ensconced behind the bar of the Queen Vic on the set of BBC's popular soap opera EastEnders. Soap stars Patsy Palmer (Bianca) and Sid Owen (Ricky) were pictured on either side of the politician, although their pose signalled a preference for reading above drinking. Bianca's favoured 'literary tipple', held carefully to display the cover title, was Bill Bryson's Notes from a Small Island; Ricky s more controversial but popular choice was John Gray's Men are from Mars, Women are from Venus. The logos emblazoned on the actors' T-shirts, which announced the beginning of the National Year of Reading (NYR), identified the policy context for this particular photo opportunity.

Such occasions have become routine events for government ministers and central to the process of policy presentation. The current emphasis on the media packaging of policy means that ministers are more likely to be seen on television opening a new hospital building or feeding their children beef-burgers during a food scare than engaged in more traditional activities such as debating at the despatch box in the House of Commons. But the photo opportunity at the Queen Vic was only a modest part of an extensive campaign to promote the National Year of Reading: the first in a series of television advertisements had been broadcast the previous evening. The Queen Vic was a particularly apposite setting for the campaign launch because the soap opera was introducing a new story line which involved the character Grant Mitchell reading to his baby daughter Courtney. Government press officers working on the campaign had also persuaded drama producers to feature story lines about literacy in other popular soap operas including Brookside, Coronation Street, Hollyoaks and Grange Hill over the coming year.

These advertising campaigns are undoubtedly problematic because of the extent to which their pre-packaged policy messages are injected into light entertainment programmes and soap operas, rather than being confined to more conventional advertising formats such as posters and leaflets. The campaign launch certainly proved controversial. Under the headline 'Big brother Blunkett is accused', the Daily Mail quoted a Conservative spokesperson who

-17-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Social Policy, the Media, and Misrepresentation
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures and Tables vii
  • Introduction 1
  • References 13
  • Part 1 - Producing Social Policy News 15
  • Chapter 1 - Soft-Soaping the Public? 17
  • References 36
  • Chapter 2 - Media Coverage of Social Policy 39
  • Chapter 3 - Charitable Images 51
  • Chapter 4 - Dying of Ignorance? 69
  • References 84
  • Part 2 - The Media Reporting of Social Policy 87
  • Chapter 5 - Poor Relations 89
  • Notes 102
  • Chapter 6 - Home Truths 104
  • Chapter 7 - The Picture of Health? 118
  • References 133
  • Chapter 8 - Media and Mental Health 135
  • Note 144
  • Chapter 9 - Thinking the Unthinkable 146
  • Note 156
  • Chapter 10 - Are You Paying Attention? 157
  • References 172
  • Chapter 11 - Exorcising Demons 174
  • Part 3 - The Media Reporting of Social Policy 191
  • Chapter 12 - Bulger, 'Back to Basics' and the Rediscovery of Community 193
  • References 205
  • Chapter 13 - The Ultimate Neighbour from Hell? 207
  • Notes 220
  • Chapter 14 - Out of the Closet 222
  • Chapter 15 - Social Threat or Social Problem? 238
  • Note 251
  • Chapter 16 - They Make Us Out to Be Monsters 253
  • Index 269
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 287

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.