The Revolutions of 1989

By Vladimir Tismaneanu | Go to book overview

8

THE LEGACY OF DISSENT

G.M. Tamás

Political philosopher G.M. Tamás was one of the main personalities of the Hungarian Democratic Opposition in the 1980s. After 1989 he remained politically active as a major figure of the Alliance of Free Democrats and author of numerous thought-provoking and deliberately controversial essays and commentaries. In this article he proposes an original explanation of the post-1989 mass disenchantment with the once presumably admired dissidents. His two-fold argument is that dissent had always been unpopular and that the dissidents' subcultures were fundamentally isolated from the population at large.

Tamás's approach tends to extrapolate the peculiar conditions of Hungary's dissident community and overlooks the exhilarating appeals of a mass social movement like Solidarity in Poland. Whatever one thinks of his bitter diagnosis of the dissidents' alienation from the societies they claimed to speak for, Tamás's essay captures accurately the ethical dimension of the critical intellectuals' calls for a new politics rooted in truth and respect for individual human rights. Particularly significant are his reflections on the ambivalence of the key strategic concept of “civil society” and the contrast he highlights between its East European and traditional Western liberal interpretations. Tamás concludes, in agreement with Poland's Adam Michnik, that the heroic times are over and that one of the legacies of dissent is a deep sense of ambiguity including a healthy suspicion regarding all political dogmas.

* * *

The dissidence of the 1970s and 1980s is rather unpopular in the Eastern Europe of today. With the exception of Poland (where there was an almost uninterrupted revolutionary tradition from 1976 on), former dissidents play but a token role in real politics, and their proudest symbols, like Walesa, Havel or Konrád, are decried as “communists, ” “traitors, ” “agents.” In the Hungarian parliament, any mention of the erstwhile dissidence is greeted with hoots of laughter, catcalls, and jeers from the government benches. Its very existence is denied sometimes by official

-181-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Revolutions of 1989
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Part I - Causes 17
  • 1 - What Happened in Eastern Europe in 1989? 19
  • 2 - Amidst Moving Ruins 51
  • 3 - What Was Socialism, and Why Did It Fall? 63
  • Part II - Meaning 87
  • 4 - The Breakdown of Communist Regimes 89
  • 5 - The Year of Truth 108
  • 6 - The Meanings of 1989 125
  • 7 - Nineteen Eighty-Nine: the End of Which European Era? 165
  • 8 - The Legacy of Dissent 181
  • 9 - Overcoming Totalitarianism 198
  • Part III - Future 203
  • 10 - The Future of Liberal Revolution 205
  • 11 - The Leninist Legacy 213
  • 12 - The Post-Totalitarian Blues 231
  • 13 - The Velvet Restoration 244
  • 14 - The Neighbors of Kafka: Intellectual's Note from the Underground 252
  • 15 - Is Communism Returning? 258
  • Index 263
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 270

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.