Plato as Author: The Rhetoric of Philosophy

By Ann N. Michelini | Go to book overview

TOPIC INDEX
[Names of ancient figures appear in bold, when they are referred to as characters in Platonic texts.]
Academy 6, 17, 40, 42, 126, 190–91, 213–14, 243, 263, 291–92
Achelous 193
Achilles 227ff.
Adeimantus60, 99–151 passim, 198
Adonis 90, 177
Aeschines of Sphettus 48
Aeschylus 184, 187, 226, 261, 314
Agathon95, 106
agriculture 89–90, 177–78
Ajax 227ff.
akousmata155–173 passim, 198–201
Alcaeus 191
Alcibiades35, 49, 57, 95–96
Anacreon 233
analytic philosophy 7, 12, 13, 252, 258, 287
anamnêsis (see recollection)
Anaxagoras 323
Antisthenes 48
Anytus96
Aphthonius 128, 131
Apollo 315
Apollodorus95–96, 327, 328
aporia (see also dialogues, aporetic) 217, 256, 259
aporrhêton189–90, 243
aprorrhêton219ff.
arrhêton190
Aristodemus95–96, 105
Aristophanes 45ff., 176, 181–82, 252
Aristotle 6, 61, 126, 190, 208–09, 212, 291 Metaphysics209, 224–25 Nicomachean Ethics19, 28ff., 69, 313 Rhetoric19, 22, 125, 138, 149, 179 Poetics153, 329ff.
Athens, civic life of 45–46, 54, 63–64, 84, 251
biography 45ff.
blame, in literature (see praise)
Callicles87, 316
Callimachus 9, 153
Charmides 63
Charmides59, 101
Choirilus 173
cicadas 192
Cicero 125ff.
cleansing (see “purification”)
competition in Greek cultures 18–19, 36, 45, 55–56
courage, definition of 157–58
craft analogy (see “technê”)
Cratylus223–40 passim
Clitophon (Cleitophon) 87, 95
Ctesippus18, 20, 51
Critias 63
Critias160–71 passim
Critias, son of Dropidas 60
Crito51, 101, 269, 324
Daedalus 165, 186
daimôn43
deliberative oratory 136f.
Delos 186
Demeter 177–76, 183, 191
Democritus [Democrates?] 171
deuteros plous129, 269, 272, 283
diaeresis252, 258–59
dialogues, Platonic see also “Platonic dialogues, individual” aporetic vs. dogmatic aspects of 13, 57–58, 73, 238, 241, 258–59, 269–70, 304, 317 athletics in 16, 37 characterization in 248–49, 252 chronology of, see developmental cultural importance of 1–2, 99 developmental approaches to 4, 13, 277–78, 291–92 dialectic 90, 92, 127, 147, 166, 169ff., 176, 190, 198, 201, 217ff. 289ff., 306, 311, 319, 321 dramatic dates of 261 dramatic/literary texts, as 44, 96–97, 107–08, 116–17, 151,

-353-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Plato as Author: The Rhetoric of Philosophy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 359

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.