Cities in China: Recipes for Economic Development in the Reform Era

By Jae Ho Chung | Go to book overview

1

Recipes for development in post-Mao Chinese cities

Themes and variations

Jae Ho Chung

Precedents of industrialization suggest that different actors and institutions may get involved as key agents of development, which include factories, investment banks, entrepreneurial bourgeoisie, foreign capital, and the state. No monocausal explanation will suffice since, at different points in time and under different politico-economic circumstances, varying combinations of factors have led to high growth. When 'telescoping' the arduous process of development is a key imperative, however, the role of the state is deemed crucial in designing overall development strategies, governing the market by getting the prices wrong, and controlling the major sources for financing development. As a matter of fact, 'taking the state seriously' as the principal architect of development has already become a cliché. 1

It should be noted, however, that the state is a multi-layered structure of authority with its own complex intra-and inter-governmental dynamics. As the extensive literature on development in general, and on the East Asian Newly Industrializing Economies (NIEs) in particular, almost uniformly adopts the highly encompassing term of 'state, ' it largely fails to differentiate the roles performed by the central and local governments in executing 'developmental intervention.' 2 System reforms in many post-communist and reforming socialist countries, too, have involved a variety of measures of decentralization and marketization, the success of which has been highly contingent upon the responses of their local implementors. 'Unpacking the state' has indeed become a crucial approach to the study of development. 3

The importance of regional and local governments in determining the path of development is nowhere more manifest than in continental states such as Russia and China. 4 China's path of development has quite closely resembled those of South Korea, Taiwan, and Singapore in that its accelerated growth was facilitated largely by the developmental state with sufficient autonomy from domestic social groups and coalitions as well as with a 'strategic capacity' to restructure the domestic market and manage external capital linkages. 5 However, unlike these East Asian NIEs where the central government was de facto the only state with any substantial power of its own, China's developmental reform was from the outset accompanied by the delegation of central authority and the promotion of local initiatives. One key consequence of such a difference is that, while the East Asian NIEs' developmental trajectory was

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Cities in China: Recipes for Economic Development in the Reform Era
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 303

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.