Cities in China: Recipes for Economic Development in the Reform Era

By Jae Ho Chung | Go to book overview

6

A tale of two cities

A comparative study of the political and economic development of Chengdu and Chongqing

Lijian Hong


Introduction

Chengdu is the capital of Sichuan Province and Chongqing is the largest industrial city at the upper reaches of the Yangtze River. Both Chengdu and Chongqing are the most industrialized cities in the western regions. Even in China, the two cities are among the largest city economies. In a more balanced economic development strategy of the Chinese new leaders, Chengdu and Chongqing are expected to play a leading role in linking China's advanced east and backward west.

Since the late 1970s, local governments in China have been granted greatly increased decision-making powers in all spheres of political, economic, financial, cultural and social life under their jurisdiction. We can no longer assume that trade, investment, and other social, economic and cultural activities are solely governed by the laws and policies of the central government. Local governments are, and increasingly becoming more so, very important players in the above areas. While much power has been delegated to provincial level administrative units, a similar process is under way from the provinces to sub-provincial units. Because of their economic strength and their political connections with the central and provincial authorities, major cities within a province are normally the first to exploit the benefits of political and economic decentralization.

Before Chongqing was upgraded to a centrally administered city, both Chengdu

Statistical profiles of Chengdu and Chongqing, 1996

Indicator

Chengdu

Chongqing

Total population (1,000)

9,808

15,300

GDP (RMB million)

86,934

123,507

GDP as percentage of Sichuan's GDP

20.6

29.3

Gross value of industrial output (RMB million)

9,5429.9

9,768.2

GVAO (RMB million)

16,838

25,825

Total foreign trade (US$ million)

450

1,380

Total foreign trade as percentage of Sichuan's total

12.1

37.0

Realized FDI (US$ million)

145

420

Realized FDI as percentage of provincial total

23.0

66.5

-183-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Cities in China: Recipes for Economic Development in the Reform Era
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 303

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.