The Military and Society in Russia: 1450-1917

By Eric Lohr; Marshall Poe | Go to book overview

LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS

Sergei Bogatyrev is docent of medieval East Slavic culture at the University of Helsinki and research fellow at the University of Joensuu. Bogatyrev graduated from the Institute for History and Archives (Moscow) and took his doctorate at the University of Helsinki. He is the author of The Sovereign and His Counsellors: Ritualised Consultations in Muscovite Political Culture, 1350s–1570s. His research interests include Muscovite political culture and regionalism in the Russian Empire.

Nicholas B. Breyfogle is Assistant Professor in the Department of History at The Ohio State University. He is currently completing work on his first book, Heretics and Colonizers: Religious Dissent and Russian Empire-Building in the South Caucasus and has begun work on his second project, tentatively entitled “Baikal: The Great Lake and its People.” His research interests include Russian colonialism, interethnic contact, peasant studies, religious belief and policy, and environmental history.

Peter Brown Peter B. Brown is Professor of history at Rhode Island College. He is the editor of Festschrift for A. A. Zimin, published as a special issue in Russian History 25, nos. 1–2 (Spring-Summer 1998) and the editor of Studies and Essays on the Soviet and Eastern European Economies by Arcadius Kahan. He is working on two book manuscripts: Serve and Control: the Structure, Expansion, and Politics of Russian Central Administration, 1613–1725 and Muscovite Military Leadership in the Early Part of the Thirteen Years' War: the Belorussian Campaign of 1654 and 1655.

Brian Davies is Associate Professor of History at the University of San Antonio. He has recently completed a study of the military colonization of Muscovy's southern frontier in the 1630s–1640s and is working on a history of Russia's 16th–18th century wars against the Crimean Khanate and Ottoman Empire.

David Goldfrank has been teaching Russian, European, and World History at Georgetown University since 1970. His writings include

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