The Military and Society in Russia: 1450-1917

By Eric Lohr; Marshall Poe | Go to book overview

TROOP MOBILIZATION BY THE MUSCOVITE
GRAND PRINCES (1313–1533)
Donald Ostrowski

Muscovy began its rise to power at the beginning of the fourteenth century at a time when northeastern Rus' was an integral part of the Mongol Empire. It existed at the very western extreme of that empire and was directly subject to the khan of the Ulus of Juchi (Desht-i-Qipchaq, called in Russian sources of the time, Orda), which I will refer to as the Qipchaq Khanate (see Figure 1). This means that, in addition to adopting the weaponry and tactics of the Mongol armies for their troops in order to engage effectively in steppe warfare, the Muscovite grand princes had to operate diplomatically and strategically not only within the confines of political and military relations with other Rus' principalities but also within the limitations that the internal politics and external policies of the Qipchaq Khanate imposed. Finally, they had to take into consideration their suzerain's relations with Lithuania in formulating their own “western” policy. How the Muscovite grand princes succeeded in doing all this is a remarkable story and well worth further analysis.

I begin this analysis with 1313, the year of the first campaign of Iurii Daniilovich, the first Muscovite prince to be grand prince of Rus', and I end it with 1533, the year of the death of Vasilii III, when Muscovy had gathered all the resources it needed for expansion into the Eurasian Heartland. Historians who presented detailed studies of all or most of this period have tended to focus primarily on political developments.1 And military historians have tended to focus mainly on weaponry and major campaigns when dealing with the fourteenth

____________________
1
The most prominent studies of this period are: L. V. Cherepnin, Obrazovanie russkogo tsentralizovannogo gosudarstva v XIV–XV vekakh (Moscow: Izdatel'stvo sotsial'noekonomicheskoi literatury, 1960); A. E. Presniakov, Obrazovanie velikorusskogo gosudarstva. Ocherki po istorii XIII–XV stoletii (Petrograd: Ia. Bashmakov, 1918); and George Vernadsky, The Mongols and Russia, vol. 3 of A History of Russia (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1953). Alef does discuss mobilization of military manpower but only for the reign of Ivan III (1462–1505). Gustave Alef, “The Origins of Muscovite Autocracy: The Age of Ivan III, ” Forschungen zur osteuropäischen Geschichte 39 (1986), 96–176.

-19-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Military and Society in Russia: 1450-1917
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 550

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.