The Military and Society in Russia: 1450-1917

By Eric Lohr; Marshall Poe | Go to book overview

IN DEFENSE OF THE REALM:
RUSSIAN ARMS TRADE AND PRODUCTION IN THE
SEVENTEENTH AND EARLY EIGHTEENTH CENTURY
GRAND PRINCES (1313–1533)
J. T. Kotilaine

This article examines one of the key challenges of Russian economic and military policy in the early modern period, that of developing a secure supply of weapons for the country's army. Throughout its long land border in Europe, Muscovy was flanked by aggressive neighbors intent on expanding into its economically and strategically important borderlands. As a country with basically no natural borders, Russia needed to devise new ways of mobilizing its limited economic resources to contain these increasingly aggressive incursions. The magnitude of the task ahead, and Russia's relative backwardness compared to her Western rivals, became obvious during the Time of Troubles when the country's leading cities—Moscow and Novgorod—fell temporarily into foreign hands.

The early modern era marks an important transition in Russian defense policy. Instead of the highly mobile mounted enemy of the steppes, Russia increasingly had to contend with the latest European weapons technology. In response, Muscovy needed to create a more or less standing army that could be mobilized with relative ease. Yet the challenge of equipping this force was a great deal more daunting in Russia than in either Sweden or Poland-Lithuania. At the beginning of the seventeenth century, Russia had practically no domestic metal industry. All domestic iron came from swamp ore and was neither voluminous nor high-grade enough to produce reliable weaponry. Muscovy was thus forced, in the first instance, to import an adequate volume of either weapons or inputs for their production. The long-term objective was to promote the development of domestic metal production, and—ultimately—to create a Russian arms industry. This paper seeks to demonstrate that late Muscovy made significant headway toward meeting both of these goals, though Russian metals and arms production never reached a sufficient scale to make the country independent of foreign imports during the period reviewed here.

-67-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Military and Society in Russia: 1450-1917
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 550

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.