The Military and Society in Russia: 1450-1917

By Eric Lohr; Marshall Poe | Go to book overview

THE RUSSIAN MILITARY AND THE JEWS
IN GALICIA, 1914–15
Dr. Alexander V. Prusin

Among the regions most severely devastated by World War I, Galicia occupies a top place. From the summer of 1914 to the fall of 1917, this densely populated Austrian province was a fluid battlefield as Austro-Hungarian and Russian armies rolled back and forth leaving behind a trail of blackened ruins. At the beginning of September of 1914, after a series of initial engagements, the Russian army occupied the provincial capital, Lwow,1 and a month later subjugated the entire eastern part of the province. Claiming to liberate the “Slavic brethren”—Ukrainians from the Austrian yoke and reunite Galicia—once a part of Kievan Rus'—with the Empire, the Russian military administration subjected the province to intensive “assimilation” campaign. Since the Russians doubted the loyalty of the population in Galicia, the occupation had disastrous consequences for all inhabitants. Arbitrary arrests, requisitions of grain and livestock, and mass deportations of potential opponents became a daily occurrence. One of the most brutal facets of Russian rule was persecution of the Jews, who were accused of sabotage, economic subversion, and active collaboration with the enemy.

This essay examines the Russian military's perceptions and attitudes towards Galician Jews focusing on the causes of wartime antiSemitism. My position is that while the persecution of Jews undeniably stemmed from traditional negative images fostered, perpetuated, and shared by large segments of Russian society, the military regime's obsession with potential saboteurs in the front zone was as consequential. This vigilance against the “enemy within” stimulated reprisals and further exacerbated anti-Jewish animosities. In turn, the reprisals generated what can be dubbed “spirals of fear”—an atmosphere of pervasive siege mentality within the Russian military, which

____________________
1
For the sake of consistency, all Galician localities are given in their contemporary pre-World War I Polish spelling.

-525-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Military and Society in Russia: 1450-1917
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 550

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.