Military Governors and Imperial Frontiers c. 1600-1800: A Study of Scotland and Empires

By A. Mackillop; Steve Murdoch | Go to book overview

INTRODUCTION

This collection examines the role of Scottish governors over a two hundred year period of history which includes Scotland's last century as an independent kingdom and first century as a component nation, along with England, of the new United Kingdom of Great Britain. The aim of this book is to highlight more specific aspects of Scotland's trajectory within the general phenomenon of European expansion from 1600 to 1800. Scotland's imperial experience during this period was one of apparent extremes. Until 1707 and its incorporation within the United Kingdom, Scotland possessed neither a mercantile, nor a territorial empire for any meaningful length of time. Thereafter, it obtained unimpeded access to England's substantial overseas trade and territories, save for the monopolies exercised by the Hudson's Bay and East India Companies. Given Scotland's geographic situation, it is unfair to contrast this seventeenth-century lack of colonies or colonial commerce with the success of England and the other great Protestant power, the Dutch Republic.1 However, even in comparison with states of a similar population and northerly European situation, such as Denmark-Norway and Sweden, Scotland appears a failure in imperial terms.2 One explanation for this failure arguably lies in the process of state formation. Although the Stuart regime had unquestionably increased its authority by the later 1630s, 'the coercive powers of the state were minimal,' especially in the localities, where legal authority was controlled largely by the nobility and landed gentry.3 The country was viewed by every one of its seventeenth-century monarchs as unruly and frustratingly prone

____________________
1
R. Mitchison, Lordship to Patronage: Scotland, 1603–1745 (London: 1983), 1–2.
2
For an earlier work that stressed the failure of Scotland's formal imperialism see G. Donaldson, The Scots Overseas (London: 1966), 38. After several decades of emphases on the country's progress and development, the extent of Scotland's relatively poor international standing and commercial performance by the 1690s has been reiterated recently. See C.A. Whatley, Scottish Society, 1707–1830 (Manchester: 2000), chapter 1.
3
K.M. Brown, Kingdom or Province? Scotland and the Regal Union, 1603–1715 (London: 1992), 2.

-xxv-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Military Governors and Imperial Frontiers c. 1600-1800: A Study of Scotland and Empires
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 245

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.