Military Governors and Imperial Frontiers c. 1600-1800: A Study of Scotland and Empires

By A. Mackillop; Steve Murdoch | Go to book overview

CHAPTER EIGHT
GOVERNOR ROBERT DINWIDDIE AND THE VIRGINIA
FRONTIER, 1751–57
Robert Cain

As editor of a series of record publications, the Colonial Records of North Carolina, it might well be reasonably expected that this short essay would address the career and experience of a Scottish governor in North Carolina. Yet there is in fact good reason for not doing this. Colonial North Carolina had a grand total of three Scottishborn governors. The first was William Drummond, governor from 1664 to 1676, and about whom almost nothing is known other than that he was hung by the governor of Virginia as a rebel in 1677. His memory survives largely in the name given a lake in the Great Dismal Swamp on the border between North Carolina and Virginia. The short administration of Thomas Pollock, meanwhile, lasted from 1712–14. The paucity of knowledge concerning Drummond and Pollock is in contrast to the last Scottish governor, Gabriel Johnston, who is admittedly a far better known individual. This is hardly surprising given that he served in that post longer than anyone else in North Carolina's colonial history—18 years, in fact, from 1734 to 1752. His career, however, is discussed in Chapter 6.

Instead, this chapter focuses on a governor of Virginia, Robert Dinwiddie, a colonial administrator who amply qualifies under the themes covered in this collection. Firstly, he was a Scot: secondly, he was very much involved in two developments that were of the first importance to the history of the American frontier and westward expansion. These two events were the birth of the Ohio Company of Virginia, and the French and Indian War—a conflict lasting nine years (1754–1763) and known on the European side of the Atlantic as the Seven Years War. As governor of Virginia, Dinwiddie administered a colony that had already experienced Scottish individuals as the Crown's executive official. Through the army, the one British institution they had already infiltrated in large numbers before 1707, Scots increasingly secured access to colonial employment in the years

-161-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Military Governors and Imperial Frontiers c. 1600-1800: A Study of Scotland and Empires
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 245

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.