Who's Who in Jewish History: After the Period of the Old Testament

By Joan Comay | Go to book overview

F

FACKENHEIM, Emil

b. 1916. Canadian theologian. Fackenheim was born in Halle, Germany and received rabbinic ordination from the Berlin Hochschule fur die Wissenschaft des Judentums. He left Germany in 1939 and attended the Universities of Aberdeen and Toronto, where he subsequently became a Professor. Since 1983 he has taught at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. Among Fackenheim's books are God's Presence in History (1972), The Jewish Return into History (1978), To Mend the World (1982.) and Quest for Past and Future (1988). In pondering the event of the Holocaust, he rejected all theological explanations. Instead he famously maintains that out of Auschwitz, God has issued a six hundred and fourteenth commandment-namely that 'Jews are forbidden to hand Hitler posthumous victory'.


FACTOR, Max

1877-1938. US manufacturer of cosmetics. Max Factor emigrated from Poland to the United States at the age of twenty-seven, and in a modest way started the cosmetics firm, which grew to be one of the largest in the United States and in the international market. He was succeeded in the management of the business by his four sons and his son-in-law, a prominent communal leader.


FAÏTLOWITZ, Jacques

1881-1955. Polish expert on the Falashas. Born in Poland, Faïtlowitz studied the Ethiopian and Amharic languages in Paris and lived for eighteen months among the Falashas, the community of Black Jews in Ethiopia. He was convinced that they were of Jewish descent and not just a native tribe converted centuries ago to Judaism, as others maintained. For the rest of his life, he travelled, wrote and lectured extensively on their behalf, trying to gain recognition for them from Jewish organizations, and collecting money to educate their children. Late in life, after World War II, he settled in Tel Aviv and continued his campaign but it was only after the State of Israel was established in 1948 that the Jewish Agency took a more active interest in the Falashas.


FALK, Samuel Jacob Chaim

c. 1710-82. London Cabbalist and alchemist. Falk was born in Galicia. An enthusiastic practitioner of the magic arts, he was said to have been condemned as a sorcerer in Westphalia, and was in fact banished from Cologne. Arriving in England in 1742, he remained in London for the rest of his life.

He soon gained notoriety for the extraordinary results he claimed to achieve through use of the secret names of God. It was for this he was called the Baal Shem, 'master of the Name'; to gentiles he was known as Dr Falcon. He lived in Wellclose Square, near the Royal Mint, and conducted experiments on Tower Bridge. Many of his exploits were recorded in the Yiddishized Hebrew and barely literate diary kept by his personal assistant, Zevi Hirsch KALISH. Falk's fame as a wonder-worker attracted the international adventurer Theodore Stephen de Stein, who claimed to be king of Corsica. He met Falk in 1749

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Who's Who in Jewish History: After the Period of the Old Testament
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Maps vi
  • Author''s Preface vii
  • Glossary viii
  • Chronology xi
  • World Jewish Population in 1993 xxxv
  • A 1
  • B 34
  • C 76
  • D 90
  • E 107
  • F 125
  • G 137
  • H 152
  • I 181
  • J 187
  • K 211
  • L 223
  • M 241
  • N 271
  • O 278
  • P 282
  • R 292
  • S 318
  • T 361
  • Uv 369
  • W 372
  • Y 389
  • Z 392
  • Thematic Index 397
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