Too Good to Be True: The Life and Work of Leslie Fiedler

By Mark Royden Winchell | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

T H I S B O O K would not have been possible without the assistance of many generous people. Leslie Fiedler's secretary, Joyce Troy, provided many helpful documents and consented to a personal interview. In addition to granting an interview, Bruce Jackson and Diane Christian also supplied several photographs that are used with permission and gratitude. James M. Cox read and commented on this book in manuscript, and William Empson's biographer, John Haffenden, supplied valuable information concerning Empson's life. David Ritter devoted many hours to proofreading the text, and he and Cari Carter assisted in preparing the index. As always, I received encouragement and support from my wife, Donna, and my sons, Jonathan and Matthew.

Thanks are also due to University of Missouri Press director Beverly Jarrett and her staff. Beverly believed in this project when it was no more than a proposal and saw it through to fruition. The book is also better for the perceptive suggestions and infinite patience of copy editor Sara Davis. Among university presses, Missouri is fast becoming the publisher of record for politically incorrect scholars.

Grateful acknowledgment is also made to the following for permission to quote from protected material: Valerie Eliot for portions of a letter from T. S. Eliot to Leslie Fiedler; Helen Ransom Forman for portions of John Crowe Ransom's correspondence; Jacobus Empson for portions of Sir William Empson's correspondence; the Richard Nixon Library and Birthplace for portions of a letter from Richard Nixon to Leslie Fiedler; and Partisan Review for portions of William Phillips's correspondence.

My largest debt is to Leslie and Sally Fiedler, who sat for interviews, provided access to their personal archives (including priceless photographs damaged in a catastrophic house fire), and granted permission to quote from both published and unpublished material far beyond the accepted bounds of fair use. Although Leslie Fiedler placed no restrictions on what I had to say or how I said it, I hope that his influence can be detected in the following pages.

-xi-

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