Regulating the Global Information Society

By Christopher T. Marsden | Go to book overview

7

Commentary

When to regulate in the GIS? A public policy perspective
Fod Barnes
What fundamental rules are needed for the information economy?
There are contrasting views on what is required, from governments, producers and even consumers, for the new information economy (or the e-economy) to 'take off', and to deliver the 'best' outcome. The range of views is sufficiently different (see other chapters in this book, for example) to indicate that there is no general agreement as to what the problem is, rather than just being alternative approaches to the same problem. This chapter, based on the experience of being at the centre of regulating the UK telecommunications industry for nine years, is an attempt to better define the fundamental problem(s) that exist now (and are likely to persist), before going on to suggest where the solutions may lie.Other chapters deal with the detail of what regulation is, or is not, needed see for example the chapter by Richard Collins. My purpose is not to deal with the detail but, if possible, with the big (economic) picture. At best, the big picture may (with some more work) create the framework for resolving some of the apparent contradictions and disagreements in the detail. At a minimum it should create a framework that is capable of being shot down, and therefore improved.There are three main issues I wish to deal with in this chapter:
• What are the really important characteristics of convergence?
• How do they change the underlying economic problems of (tele)communications?
• What does that mean for the proper 'regulation' of communications?

Not understanding the wood for the trees

But first it is necessary to dispose of a small problem of language: 'regulation', and hence 'deregulation', 'liberalisation' and 're-regulation' are politically charged terms, and mean very different things to different people. 'Regulation' is also often contrasted to 'competition' as if they were more or less mutually exclusive-which ignores probably the most important developments in telecom-munications, regulation for competition. To try to avoid purely semantic disagreements

-116-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Regulating the Global Information Society
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 364

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.