Women in Missouri History: In Search of Power and Influence

By Leeann Whites; Mary C. Neth et al. | Go to book overview

Euphemia B. Koller and the Politics of
Insanity in Ralls County, 1921—1927

Gregg Andrews

On February 24, 1930, Euphemia B. Koller, age sixty-eight, died while confined in Missouri's State Hospital for the Insane in Fulton. In an obituary, the Hannibal Courier-Post noted that she and her sister, Mary Alice Heinbach, formerly co-owned the unincorporated town site of Ilasco, a largely Slavic community of about two thousand residents, just across the Marion/Ralls county line near the Mark Twain Cave, about three miles south of Hannibal. According to the obituary, the Atlas Portland Cement Company had purchased the Ilasco tract from them about twenty-five years earlier when it built a plant next to their property. A Ralls County probate judge had ordered Koller's confinement as a private patient in August 1927. To underscore the special tragedy of her fate in the asylum, a New London newspaper recalled that “many years ago she was a brilliant woman, being well-educated, refined, and a fluent talker.” 1.

The Hannibal Courier-Post, although well aware of the connections between Koller's fate and a bitter, protracted legal battle over the twenty-six- acre tract on which much of Ilasco was located, used her death to promote an official “booster” version of Ilasco's history that concealed an important secret and glorified Atlas's paternalistic role in the community. In a complex case that went to the state supreme court several times, Koller and

____________________
1.
Hannibal Courier-Post, February 26, 1930; Euphemia B. Koller, Certificate of Death, February 24, 1930, Missouri State Board of Health, Bureau of Vital Statistics, Jefferson City; Ralls County Record, February 28, 1930.

-200-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Women in Missouri History: In Search of Power and Influence
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 275

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.