Dangerous Donations: Northern Philanthropy and Southern Black Education, 1902-1930

By Eric Anderson; Alfred A. Moss Jr. | Go to book overview

3

The Education of a Philanthropist
WilliamH. Baldwin, Jr., 1898—1905

You have never doubted the advisability of giving your own children a reasonable education—are not such doubts always about the children of others?

—W. H. Baldwin, Jr. 1.

From the outside, to critics and beneficiaries, “Ogdenism” appeared strong and consistent. From within the philanthropic movement, however, it was easier to perceive the uncertainty, shifting options, and development incident to any reform movement. The career of William Henry Baldwin, Jr., Tuskegee trustee, member of the Southern Education Board, and first chairman of the General Education Board, is both a good illustration of the philanthropists and their ideals, and, at the same time, a revealing example of failure, the representation of an important “road not taken.”

Baldwin was a wealthy, reform-minded businessman whose philanthropic activity has been explained in two ways. According to one interpretation, his commitment to reform was the direct product of economic motivation, with calculating self-interest lying behind his concern for black education. He was, in short, a pseudo-reformer. The alternative explanation for Baldwin's philanthropy is even simpler. Here was a good man, an exemplary American citizen, who provided inspirational (or “sentimental”) leadership purely out of a sense of duty. Good deeds, from this perspective, require no explanation, nor is there anything mysterious about philanthropic motivation. Neither explanation is entirely satisfactory nor completely wrong.

____________________
1.
William H. Baldwin, Jr., “Why a Businessman Should Be Interested in Public Education, ” November 22, 1902, speech to the Richmond Educational Association, in William H. Baldwin [III] Papers, State Historical Society of Wisconsin.

-63-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Dangerous Donations: Northern Philanthropy and Southern Black Education, 1902-1930
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 245

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.