James Joyce and Victims: Reading the Logic of Exclusion

By Sean P. Murphy | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

WHEN THE STUDENT IS READY, THE TEACHER WILL APPEAR. FORTUnately, I have studied with teachers to whom I am greatly indebted. In some ways, I began the intellectual journey charted in this book at Saint Bonaventure University. There Joseph Tedesco modeled for me the ethics of caring in and out of the classroom. I was privileged to meet a great mentor, Earl Ingersoll, at the State University of New York at Brockport, who challenged me to engage the complexities of texts and theories.

I extend heartfelt thanks to all the people at Kent State University who generously read early drafts of this work and who offered invaluable advice. They include Thomas Hines, Julio Pino, Margaret Shaw, Kathe Davis, Ron Corthell, Diana Culbertson, Dawn Lashua, and Liz Siciliano. Special thanks to my trusted friend and advisor, Claire Culleton (a.k.a. Susie).

Of my family, I express gratitude to Mom and Dad for their consistent care, love, and encouragement. Thanks also to Garrie, Pat, Liam, Conor, Molly, Tim, Mylene, Beth, Jim, Lauren, Amanda Leigh, Chris, Don, Alice, Tim, Terri, and Joe for their examples. I remember, too, Grammy Murphy, Grammy Tracy, Grampy Murphy, Grampy Tracy, and all the members of my extended family who have touched my life and inspired my hope for a more just social order.

I also wish to thank Jenn Ashcraft, Scott Barth, Chandra and John Bertolini, Denise Brown, Rick Brown, Tom DeKemper, Pat and Janet Fye, Mark Garapic, Rose Gee, Kate Good, Frank Haislah, Jim Holme, Chuck Keatts, Terry Kreakie, Lawrence Prichard, Kailash Satyamurthy, Bob Smith, Fred Smith, Amy Ujvari, Bob Way, Keith Wemm, Bill Wilson, Rhonda Wilson, and literally hundreds of others for their collective wisdom, humor, joy, and advice. With Ann Carter, in whose memory the spirit of this book is dedicated, I share the pleasure that comes from dreams fulfilled.

My colleagues at the College of Lake County have taught me much about teaching, and they have unfailingly championed my

-9-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
James Joyce and Victims: Reading the Logic of Exclusion
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 192

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.